Results 41 - 60 of 100 for Fair Havens (0.000 seconds)
(0.25)(Psa 58:1)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;the sons of mankind.&#8221; The translation assumes the phrase is the object of the verb &#8220;to judge.&#8221; Some take it as a vocative, &#8220;Do you judge fairly, O sons of mankind?&#8221; (Cf. NASB; see Ezek 20:4; 22:2; 23:36.)

(0.25)(Psa 67:4)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;for you judge nations fairly, and [as for the] peoples in the earth, you lead them.&#8221; The imperfects are translated with the present tense because the statement is understood as a generalization about God&#8217;s providential control of the world. Another option is to understand the statement as anticipating God&#8217;s future rule (&#8220;for you will rule&#8230;and govern&#8221;).

(0.25)(Pro 16:11)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;a scale and balances of justice.&#8221; This is an attributive genitive, meaning &#8220;just scales and balances.&#8221; The law required that scales and measures be accurate and fair (Lev 19:36; Deut 25:13). Shrewd dishonest people kept light and heavy weights to make unfair transactions.

(0.25)(Isa 5:16)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;The holy God will be set apart by fairness.&#8221; In this context God&#8217;s holiness is his sovereign royal authority, which implies a commitment to justice (see the note on the phrase &#8220;the sovereign king of Israel&#8221; in 1:4). When God judges evildoers as they deserve, his sovereignty will be acknowledged.

(0.25)(Isa 16:5)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;one who judges and seeks justice, and one experienced in fairness.&#8221; Many understand <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1456;&#1492;&#1460;&#1512;font> (<font face="Scholar">m&#255;hirfont>) to mean &#8220;quick, prompt&#8221; (see BDB 555 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1464;&#1492;&#1460;&#1497;&#1512;font>), but <i>HALOTi> 552 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1464;&#1492;&#1460;&#1497;&#1512;font> offers the meaning &#8220;skillful, experienced,&#8221; and translates the phrase in v. 5 &#8220;zealous for what is right.&#8221;

(0.25)(Mat 1:21)

sn The Greek form of the name <font face="Greektl">Ihsousfont>, which was translated into Latin as <i>Jesusi>, is the same as the Hebrew <font face="Scholar">Yeshuafont> (Joshua), which means &#8220;Yahweh saves&#8221; (Yahweh is typically rendered as &#8220;Lord&#8221; in the OT). It was a fairly common name among Jews in 1st century Palestine, as references to a number of people by this name in the LXX and Josephus indicate.

(0.25)(Mat 15:32)

tc &#8225; Although the external evidence is not great (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;font> W <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#920;font> 700 <i>pci>), the internal evidence for the omission of <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#945;&#8016;&#964;&#959;&#8166;font> (<font face="Greektl">autoufont>, &#8220;his&#8221;) after &#8220;disciples&#8221; is fairly strong. The pronoun may have been added by way of clarification. NA<sup>27sup>, however, includes the pronoun, on the basis of the much stronger external evidence.

(0.25)(Luk 15:29)

sn <i>You never gave me even a goat.i> The older son&#8217;s complaint was that the generous treatment of the younger son was not fair: &#8220;I can&#8217;t get even a little celebration with a basic food staple like a goat!&#8221;

(0.25)(Joh 10:6)

sn A <i>parablei> is a fairly short narrative that has symbolic meaning. The Greek word <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#959;&#953;&#956;&#943;&#945;&#957;font> (<font face="Greektl">paroimianfont>) is used again in 16:25, 29. This term does not occur in the synoptic gospels, where <font face="Galaxie Unicode Greek">&#960;&#945;&#961;&#945;&#946;&#959;&#955;&#8053;font> (<font face="Greektl">parabolhfont>) is used. Nevertheless it is similar, denoting a short narrative with figurative or symbolic meaning.

(0.22)(Exo 13:17)

sn The verb <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1495;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">nakhahfont>, &#8220;to lead&#8221;) is a fairly common word in the Bible for God&#8217;s leading of his people (as in Ps 23:3 for leading in the paths of righteousness). This passage illustrates what others affirm, that God leads his people in a way that is for their own good. There were shorter routes to take, but the people were not ready for them.

(0.22)(Exo 23:1)

sn People who claim to worship and serve the righteous judge of the universe must preserve equity and justice in their dealings with others. These verses teach that God&#8217;s people must be honest witnesses (1-3); God&#8217;s people must be righteous even with enemies (4-5); and God&#8217;s people must be fair in dispensing justice (6-9).

(0.22)(Lev 23:34)

tn The rendering &#8220;booths&#8221; (cf. NAB, NASB, NRSV) is probably better than the traditional &#8220;tabernacles&#8221; in light of the meaning of the term <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1467;&#1499;&#1468;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">sukkahfont>, &#8220;hut, booth&#8221;), but &#8220;booths&#8221; are frequently associated with trade shows and craft fairs in contemporary American English. The nature of the celebration during this feast (see the following verses) as a commemoration of the wanderings of the Israelites after they left Egypt suggests that a translation like &#8220;temporary shelters&#8221; is more appropriate.

(0.22)(Ezr 4:8)

sn Like Rehum, Shimshai was apparently a fairly high-ranking official charged with overseeing Persian interests in this part of the empire. His title was &#8220;scribe&#8221; or &#8220;secretary,&#8221; but in a more elevated political sense than that word sometimes has elsewhere. American governmental titles such as &#8220;Secretary of State&#8221; perhaps provide an analogy in that the word &#8220;secretary&#8221; can have a broad range of meaning.

(0.22)(Pro 6:1)

sn It was fairly common for people to put up some kind of financial security for someone else, that is, to underwrite another&#8217;s debts. But the pledge in view here was foolish because the debtor was a neighbor who was not well known (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1494;&#1464;&#1512;font>, <i>zari>), perhaps a misfit in the community. The one who pledged security for this one was simply gullible.

(0.22)(Sos 6:10)

tn The adjective <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1488;&#1464;&#1497;&#1465;&#1501;font> (&#8217;<font face="Scholar">ayomfont>) has been nuanced &#8220;terrible&#8221; (KJV, RSV), &#8220;frightful, fear-inspiring&#8221; (Delitzsch), &#8220;majestic&#8221; (NIV), &#8220;awesome&#8221; (NASB). In the light of its parallelism with <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;&#1464;&#1508;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">yafahfont>, &#8220;beautiful&#8221;) and <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1504;&#1464;&#1488;&#1493;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">nafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">vahfont>, &#8220;lovely&#8221;) in 6:4, and <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;&#1464;&#1508;&#1464;&#1492;font> (&#8220;fair&#8221;) and <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1489;&#1468;&#1464;&#1512;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">barahfont>, &#8220;bright&#8221;) in 6:10, it should be nuanced &#8220;awe-inspiring&#8221; or &#8220;unnervingly beautiful.&#8221;

(0.22)(Isa 5:7)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;but, look, a cry for help.&#8221; The verb (&#8220;he waited&#8221;) does double duty in the parallelism. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1510;&#1456;&#1506;&#1464;&#1511;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">tsafont>&#8217;<font face="Scholar">qahfont>) refers to the cries for help made by the oppressed. It sounds very much like <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1510;&#1456;&#1491;&#1464;&#1511;&#1464;&#1492;font> (<font face="Scholar">ts&#255;daqahfont>, &#8220;fairness&#8221;). The sound play draws attention to the point being made; the people have not met the Lord&#8217;s expectations.

(0.22)(Jer 12:1)

tn <i>Hebi> &#8220;judgments&#8221; or &#8220;matters of justice.&#8221; For the nuance of &#8220;complain to,&#8221; &#8220;fair,&#8221; &#8220;disposition of justice&#8221; assumed here, see BDB 936 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1512;&#1460;&#1497;&#1489;font> Qal.4 (cf. Judg 21:22); BDB 843 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1510;&#1463;&#1491;&#1468;&#1460;&#1497;&#1511;font> 1.d (cf. Ps 7:12; 11:7); BDB 1049 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1502;&#1460;&#1513;&#1473;&#1456;&#1508;&#1468;&#1464;&#1496;font> 1.f (cf. Isa 26:8; Ps 10:5; Ezek 7:27).

(0.22)(Jer 31:22)

tn The meaning of this last line is uncertain. The translation has taken it as proverbial for something new and unique. For a fairly complete discussion of most of the options see C. Feinberg, &#8220;Jeremiah,&#8221; <i>EBCi> 6:571. For the nuance of &#8220;protecting&#8221; for the verb here see BDB 686 s.v. <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1505;&#1464;&#1489;&#1463;&#1489;font> Po&#8216; 1 and compare the usage in Deut 32:10.

(0.22)(Mar 4:32)

tn Mark 4:31-32 is fairly awkward in Greek. Literally the sentence reads as follows: &#8220;As a mustard seed, which when sown in the earth, being the smallest of all the seeds in the earth, and when it is sown, it grows up&#8230;&#8221; The structure has been rendered in more idiomatic English, although some of the awkward structure has been retained for rhetorical effect.

(0.19)(Exo 15:2)

tn The word <font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1493;&#1456;&#1494;&#1460;&#1502;&#1456;&#1512;&#1464;&#1514;font> (<font face="Scholar">v&#255;zimratfont>) is problematic. It probably had a suffix <font face="Scholar">yodfont> (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;font>) that was accidentally dropped because of the <i>yodi> (<font face="Galaxie Unicode Hebrew">&#1497;font>) on the divine name following. Most scholars posit another meaning for the word. A meaning of &#8220;power&#8221; fits the line fairly well, forming a hendiadys with strength &#8211; &#8220;strength and power&#8221; becoming &#8220;strong power.&#8221; Similar lines are in Isa 12:2 and Ps 118:14. Others suggest &#8220;protection&#8221; or &#8220;glory.&#8221; However, there is nothing substantially wrong with &#8220;my song&#8221; in the line &#8211; only that it would be a nicer match if it had something to do with strength.