NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Mark 9:23

Context
9:23 Then Jesus said to him, “‘If you are able?’ 1  All things are possible for the one who believes.”

Matthew 19:26

Context
19:26 Jesus 2  looked at them and replied, “This is impossible for mere humans, 3  but for God all things are possible.”

Matthew 17:20

Context
17:20 He told them, “It was because of your little faith. I tell you the truth, 4  if you have faith the size of 5  a mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move; nothing 6  will be impossible for you.”

Philippians 4:13

Context
4:13 I am able to do all things 7  through the one 8  who strengthens me.

1 tc Most mss (A C3 Ψ 33 Ï) have τὸ εἰ δύνασαι πιστεῦσαι (to ei dunasai pisteusai, “if you are able to believe”), instead of τὸ εἰ δύνῃ (to ei dunh, “if you are able”; supported by א B C* L N* Δ Ë1 579 892 pc). Others have εἰ δύνῃ (or δυνάσαι) πιστεῦσαι (“if you are able to believe”; so D K Θ Ë13 28 565 al), while still others have τοῦτο εἰ δύνῃ (touto ei dunh, “if you can [do] this”; so [Ì45] W). The reading that best explains the rise of the others is τὸ εἰ δύνῃ. The neuter article indicates that the Lord is now quoting the boy’s father who, in v. 22, says εἴ τι δύνῃ (ei ti dunh, “if you are able to do anything”). The article is thus used anaphorically (see ExSyn 238). However, scribes could easily have overlooked this idiom and would consequently read τὸ εἰ δύνῃ as the protasis of a conditional clause of the Lord’s statement. As such, it would almost demand the infinitive πιστεῦσαι, producing the reading τὸ εἰ δύνασαι πιστεῦσαι (“if you are able to believe, all things are possible…”). But the article here seems to be meaningless, prompting other scribes to modify the text still further. Some dropped the nonsensical article, while others turned it into the demonstrative τοῦτο and dropped the infinitive. It is clear that scribes had difficulty with the original wording here, and made adjustments in various directions. What might not be so clear is the exact genealogy of the descent of all the readings. However, τὸ εἰ δύνῃ is both a hard saying, best explains the rise of the other readings, and is supported by the best witnesses. It thus rightly deserves to be considered authentic.

2 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

3 tn The plural Greek term ἄνθρωποις (anqrwpois) is used here in a generic sense, referring to both men and women (cf. NASB 1995 update, “people”). Because of the contrast here between mere mortals and God (“impossible for men, but for God all things are possible”) the phrase “mere humans” has been used in the translation. There may also be a slight wordplay with “the Son of Man” in v. 28.

4 tn Grk “For truly (ἀμήν, amhn), I say to you.” Here γάρ (gar) has not been translated.

5 tn Grk “faith as,” “faith like.”

6 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated.

7 tn The Greek word translated “all things” is in emphatic position at the beginning of the Greek sentence.

8 tc Although some excellent witnesses lack explicit reference to the one strengthening Paul (so א* A B D* I 33 1739 lat co Cl), the majority of witnesses (א2 D2 [F G] Ψ 075 1881 Ï sy) add Χριστῷ (Cristw) here (thus, “through Christ who strengthens me”). But this kind of reading is patently secondary, and is a predictable variant. Further, the shorter reading is much harder, for it leaves the agent unspecified.



TIP #02: Try using wildcards "*" or "?" for b?tter wor* searches. [ALL]
created in 0.06 seconds
powered by bible.org