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Psalms 60:8

Context

60:8 Moab is my washbasin. 1 

I will make Edom serve me. 2 

I will shout in triumph over Philistia.” 3 

Psalms 83:7

Context

83:7 Gebal, 4  Ammon, and Amalek,

Philistia and the inhabitants of Tyre. 5 

Psalms 87:4

Context

87:4 I mention Rahab 6  and Babylon to my followers. 7 

Here are 8  Philistia and Tyre, 9  along with Ethiopia. 10 

It is said of them, “This one was born there.” 11 

Psalms 108:9

Context

108:9 Moab is my wash basin. 12 

I will make Edom serve me. 13 

I will shout in triumph over Philistia.”

1 sn The metaphor of the washbasin, used to rinse one’s hands and feet, suggests that Moab, in contrast to Israel’s elevated position (vv. 6-7), would be reduced to the status of a servant.

2 tn Heb “over Edom I will throw my sandal.” The point of the metaphor is not entirely clear. Some interpret this as idiomatic for “taking possession of,” i.e., “I will take possession of Edom.” Others translate עַל (’al) as “to” and understand this as referring to a master throwing his dirty sandal to a servant so that the latter might dust it off.

3 tc Heb “over me, O Philistia, shout in triumph.” The translation follows the text of Ps 108:9. When the initial עֲלֵיוֹ (’aleyo, “over”) was misread as עָלַי (’alay, “over me”), the first person verb form was probably altered to an imperative to provide better sense to the line.

4 sn Some identify Gebal with the Phoenician coastal city of Byblos (see Ezek 27:9, where the name is spelled differently), though others locate this site south of the Dead Sea (see BDB 148 s.v. גְּבַל; HALOT 174 s.v. גְּבַל).

5 map For location see Map1 A2; Map2 G2; Map4 A1; JP3 F3; JP4 F3.

6 snRahab,” which means “proud one,” is used here as a title for Egypt (see Isa 30:7).

7 tn Heb “to those who know me” (see Ps 36:10). Apparently the Lord speaks here. The verbal construction (the Hiphil of זָכַר, zakhar, “remember” followed by the preposition -לְ [le] with a substantive) is rare, but the prepositional phrase is best understood as indicating the recipient of the announcement (see Jer 4:16). Some take the preposition in the sense of “among” and translate, “among those who know me” (cf. NEB, NIV, NRSV). In this case these foreigners are viewed as the Lord’s people and the psalm is interpreted as anticipating a time when all nations will worship the Lord (see Ps 86:9) and be considered citizens of Zion.

8 tn Heb “Look.”

9 map For location see Map1 A2; Map2 G2; Map4 A1; JP3 F3; JP4 F3.

10 tn Heb “Cush.”

11 tn Heb “and this one was born there.” The words “It is said of them” are not in the Hebrew text, but are supplied for clarification and stylistic purposes (see v. 5). Those advocating the universalistic interpretation understand “there” as referring to Zion, but it seems more likely that the adverb refers to the nations just mentioned. The foreigners are identified by their native lands.

12 sn The metaphor of the wash basin, used to rinse one’s hands and feet, suggests that Moab, in contrast to Israel’s elevated position (vv. 7-8), would be reduced to the status of a servant.

13 tn Heb “over Edom I will throw my sandal.” The point of the metaphor is not entirely clear. Some interpret this as idiomatic for “taking possession of.” Others translate עַל (’al) as “to” and understand this as referring to a master throwing his dirty sandal to a servant so that the latter might dust it off.



TIP #08: Use the Strong Number links to learn about the original Hebrew and Greek text. [ALL]
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