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Mark 8:22-36

Context
A Two-stage Healing

8:22 Then 1  they came to Bethsaida. They brought a blind man to Jesus 2  and asked him to touch him. 8:23 He took the blind man by the hand and brought him outside of the village. Then 3  he spit on his eyes, placed his hands on his eyes 4  and asked, “Do you see anything?” 8:24 Regaining his sight 5  he said, “I see people, but they look like trees walking.” 8:25 Then Jesus 6  placed his hands on the man’s 7  eyes again. And he opened his eyes, 8  his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. 8:26 Jesus 9  sent him home, saying, “Do not even go into the village.” 10 

Peter’s Confession

8:27 Then Jesus and his disciples went to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. 11  On the way he asked his disciples, 12  “Who do people say that I am?” 8:28 They said, 13  “John the Baptist, others say Elijah, 14  and still others, one of the prophets.” 8:29 He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, 15  “You are the Christ.” 16  8:30 Then 17  he warned them not to tell anyone about him. 18 

First Prediction of Jesus’ Death and Resurrection

8:31 Then 19  Jesus 20  began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer 21  many things and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and experts in the law, 22  and be killed, and after three days rise again. 8:32 He spoke openly about this. So 23  Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. 8:33 But after turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan. You are not setting your mind on God’s interests, but on man’s.” 24 

Following Jesus

8:34 Then 25  Jesus 26  called the crowd, along with his disciples, and said to them, “If anyone wants to become my follower, 27  he must deny 28  himself, take up his cross, 29  and follow me. 8:35 For whoever wants to save his life 30  will lose it, 31  but whoever loses his life for my sake and for the gospel will save it. 8:36 For what benefit is it for a person 32  to gain the whole world, yet 33  forfeit his life?

1 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

2 tn Grk “to him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

3 tn Grk “village, and.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative. Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

4 tn Grk “on him,” but the word πάλιν in v. 25 implies that Jesus touched the man’s eyes at this point.

5 tn The verb ἀναβλέπω, though normally meaning “look up,” when used in conjunction with blindness means “regain sight.”

6 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

7 tn Grk “his”; the referent (the blind man) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

8 tn Or “he looked intently”; or “he stared with eyes wide open” (BDAG 226 s.v. διαβλέπω 1).

9 tn Grk “He”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

10 tc Codex Bezae (D) replaces “Do not even go into the village” with “Go to your house, and do not tell anyone, not even in the village.” Other mss with some minor variations (Θ Ë13 28 565 2542 pc) expand on this prohibition to read “Go to your house, and if you go into the village, do not tell anyone.” There are several other variants here as well. While these expansions are not part of Mark’s original text, they do accurately reflect the sense of Jesus’ prohibition.

11 map Fpr location see Map1 C1; Map2 F4.

12 tn Grk “he asked his disciples, saying to them.” The phrase λέγων αὐτοῖς (legwn autois) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

13 tn Grk “And they said to him, saying.” The participle λέγοντες (legontes) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

14 sn The appearance of Elijah would mean that the end time had come. According to 2 Kgs 2:11, Elijah was still alive. In Mal 4:5 it is said that Elijah would be the precursor of Messiah.

15 tn Grk “Answering, Peter said to him.” This is redundant in contemporary English and has been simplified to “Peter answered him.”

16 tn Or “the Messiah”; both “Christ” (Greek) and “Messiah” (Hebrew and Aramaic) mean “one who has been anointed.”

sn The term χριστός (cristos) was originally an adjective (“anointed”), developing in LXX into a substantive (“an anointed one”), then developing still further into a technical generic term (“the anointed one”). In the intertestamental period it developed further into a technical term referring to the hoped-for anointed one, that is, a specific individual. In the NT the development starts there (technical-specific), is so used in the gospels, and then develops in Paul to mean virtually Jesus’ last name.

17 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “Then” to indicate the conclusion of the episode.

18 sn Mark 8:27-10:52. The entire section 8:27-10:52 is built around three passion predictions of Jesus (8:31; 9:31; 10:33). These predictions form the structure of the section, the content for the section (Jesus’ suffering, death, and the meaning of genuine discipleship) and the mood of the section (i.e., a somber mood). What is interesting is that after each passion prediction, Mark records both the misunderstanding of the disciples and then Jesus’ teaching on the nature of his death and what genuine discipleship is all about: (1) denying oneself (8:34-38); (2) humility and serving (9:33-37); (3) suffering, humble service, and not lording it over people (10:35-45). For further discussion of the structure of the passage, see W. L. Lane, Mark (NICNT), 292-94.

19 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

20 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

21 sn The necessity that the Son of Man suffer is the particular point that needed emphasis, since for many 1st century Jews the Messiah was a glorious and powerful figure, not a suffering one.

22 tn Or “and the scribes.” See the note on the phrase “experts in the law” in 1:22.

23 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “So” to indicate Peter’s rebuke is in response to Jesus’ teaching about the suffering of the Son of Man.

24 tn Grk “people’s.”

25 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

26 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

27 tn Grk “to follow after me.”

28 tn This translation better expresses the force of the Greek third person imperative than the traditional “let him deny,” which could be understood as merely permissive.

29 sn To bear the cross means to accept the rejection of the world for turning to Jesus and following him. Discipleship involves a death that is like a crucifixion; see Gal 6:14.

30 tn Or “soul” (throughout vv. 35-37).

31 sn The point of the saying whoever wants to save his life will lose it is that if one comes to Jesus then rejection by many will certainly follow. If self-protection is a key motivation, then one will not respond to Jesus and will not be saved. One who is willing to risk rejection will respond and find true life.

32 tn Grk “a man,” but ἄνθρωπος (anqrwpo") is used in a generic sense here to refer to both men and women.

33 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “yet” to indicate the contrast present in this context.



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