NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Mark 1:40-45

Context
Cleansing a Leper

1:40 Now 1  a leper 2  came to him and fell to his knees, asking for help. “If 3  you are willing, you can make me clean,” he said. 1:41 Moved with compassion, 4  Jesus 5  stretched out his hand and touched 6  him, saying, “I am willing. Be clean!” 1:42 The leprosy left him at once, and he was clean. 1:43 Immediately Jesus 7  sent the man 8  away with a very strong warning. 1:44 He told him, 9  “See that you do not say anything to anyone, 10  but go, show yourself to a priest, and bring the offering that Moses commanded 11  for your cleansing, as a testimony to them.” 12  1:45 But as the man 13  went out he began to announce it publicly and spread the story widely, so that Jesus 14  was no longer able to enter any town openly but stayed outside in remote places. Still 15  they kept coming 16  to him from everywhere.

1 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

2 sn The ancient term for leprosy covers a wider array of conditions than what we call leprosy today. A leper was totally ostracized from society until he was declared cured (Lev 13:45-46).

3 tn This is a third class condition. The report portrays the leper making no presumptions about whether Jesus will heal him or not.

4 tc The reading found in almost the entire NT ms tradition is σπλαγχνισθείς (splancnisqei", “moved with compassion”). Codex Bezae (D), {1358}, and a few Latin mss (a ff2 r1*) here read ὀργισθείς (ojrgisqei", “moved with anger”). It is more difficult to account for a change from “moved with compassion” to “moved with anger” than it is for a copyist to soften “moved with anger” to “moved with compassion,” making the decision quite difficult. B. M. Metzger (TCGNT 65) suggests that “moved with anger” could have been prompted by 1:43, “Jesus sent the man away with a very strong warning.” It also could have been prompted by the man’s seeming doubt about Jesus’ desire to heal him (v. 40). As well, it is difficult to explain why scribes would be prone to soften the text here but not in Mark 3:5 or 10:14 (where Jesus is also said to be angry or indignant). Thus, in light of diverse mss supporting “moved with compassion,” and at least a plausible explanation for ὀργισθείς as arising from the other reading, it is perhaps best to adopt σπλαγχνισθείς as the original reading. Nevertheless, a decision in this case is not easy. For the best arguments for ὀργισθείς, however, see M. A. Proctor, “The ‘Western’ Text of Mark 1:41: A Case for the Angry Jesus” (Ph.D. diss., Baylor University, 1999).

5 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

6 sn Touched. This touch would have rendered Jesus ceremonially unclean (Lev 14:46; also Mishnah, m. Nega’im 3.1; 11.1; 12.1; 13.6-12).

7 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

8 tn Grk “him”; the referent (the man who was healed) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

9 tn Grk “And after warning him, he immediately sent him away and told him.”

10 sn The silence ordered by Jesus was probably meant to last only until the cleansing took place with the priests and sought to prevent Jesus’ healings from becoming the central focus of the people’s reaction to him. See also 1:34; 3:12; 5:43; 7:36; 8:26, 30; and 9:9 for other cases where Jesus asks for silence concerning him and his ministry.

11 sn On the phrase bring the offering that Moses commanded see Lev 14:1-32.

12 tn Or “as an indictment against them”; or “as proof to the people.” This phrase could be taken as referring to a positive witness to the priests, a negative testimony against them, or as a testimony to the community that the man had indeed been cured. In any case, the testimony shows that Jesus is healing and ministering to those in need.

13 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the man who was healed) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

14 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

15 tn Grk “and”; καί (kai) often has a mildly contrastive force, as here.

16 tn The imperfect verb has been translated iteratively.



TIP #25: What tip would you like to see included here? Click "To report a problem/suggestion" on the bottom of page and tell us. [ALL]
created in 0.04 seconds
powered by bible.org