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John 19:31-42

Context

19:31 Then, because it was the day of preparation, so that the bodies should not stay on the crosses on the Sabbath 1  (for that Sabbath was an especially important one), 2  the Jewish leaders 3  asked Pilate to have the victims’ legs 4  broken 5  and the bodies taken down. 6  19:32 So the soldiers came and broke the legs of the two men who had been crucified 7  with Jesus, 8  first the one and then the other. 9  19:33 But when they came to Jesus and saw that he was already dead, they did not break his legs. 19:34 But one of the soldiers pierced 10  his side with a spear, and blood and water 11  flowed out immediately. 19:35 And the person who saw it 12  has testified (and his testimony is true, and he 13  knows that he is telling the truth), 14  so that you also may believe. 19:36 For these things happened so that the scripture would be fulfilled, “Not a bone of his will be broken.” 15  19:37 And again another scripture says, “They will look on the one whom they have pierced.” 16 

Jesus’ Burial

19:38 After this, Joseph of Arimathea, a disciple of Jesus (but secretly, because he feared the Jewish leaders 17 ), 18  asked Pilate if he could remove the body of Jesus. Pilate 19  gave him permission, so he went and took the body away. 20  19:39 Nicodemus, the man who had previously come to Jesus 21  at night, 22  accompanied Joseph, 23  carrying a mixture of myrrh and aloes 24  weighing about seventy-five pounds. 25  19:40 Then they took Jesus’ body and wrapped it, with the aromatic spices, 26  in strips of linen cloth 27  according to Jewish burial customs. 28  19:41 Now at the place where Jesus 29  was crucified 30  there was a garden, 31  and in the garden 32  was a new tomb where no one had yet been buried. 33  19:42 And so, because it was the Jewish day of preparation 34  and the tomb was nearby, 35  they placed Jesus’ body there.

1 sn The Jewish authorities, because this was the day of preparation for the Sabbath and the Passover (cf. 19:14), requested Pilate to order the legs of the three who had been crucified to be broken. This would hasten their deaths, so that the bodies could be removed before the beginning of the Sabbath at 6 p.m. This was based on the law of Deut 21:22-23 and Josh 8:29 that specified the bodies of executed criminals who had been hanged on a tree should not remain there overnight. According to Josephus this law was interpreted in the 1st century to cover the bodies of those who had been crucified (J. W. 4.5.2 [4.317]). Philo of Alexandria also mentions that on occasion, especially at festivals, the bodies were taken down and given to relatives to bury (Flaccus 10 [83]). The normal Roman practice would have been to leave the bodies on the crosses, to serve as a warning to other would-be offenders.

2 sn This is a parenthetical note by the author.

3 tn Or “the Jewish authorities”; Grk “the Jews.” Here the phrase refers to the Jewish leaders. See also the note on the phrase “Jewish leaders” in v. 7.

4 tn Grk “asked Pilate that the legs of them might be broken.” The referent of “them” (the three individuals who were crucified, collectively referred to as “the victims”) has been supplied in the translation for clarity.

5 sn To have the legs…broken. Breaking the legs of a crucified person was a way of speeding up his death, since the victim could no longer use his legs to push upward in order to be able to draw a breath. This breaking of the legs was called in Latin crurifragium, and was done with a heavy mallet.

6 tn Grk “asked Pilate that their legs might be broken and they might be taken down.” Here because of the numerous ambiguous third person references it is necessary to clarify that it was the crucified men whose legs were to be broken and whose corpses were to be removed from the crosses.

7 sn See the note on Crucify in 19:6.

8 tn Grk “with him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

9 tn Grk “broke the legs of the first and of the other who had been crucified with him.”

10 sn If it was obvious to the soldiers that the victim was already dead it is difficult to see why one of them would try to inflict a wound. The Greek verb pierced (νύσσω, nussw) can indicate anything from a slight prod to a mortal wound. Probably one of the soldiers gave an exploratory stab to see if the body would jerk. If not, he was really dead. This thrust was hard enough to penetrate the side, since the author states that blood and water flowed out immediately.

11 sn How is the reference to the blood and water that flowed out from Jesus’ side to be understood? This is probably to be connected with the statements in 1 John 5:6-8. In both passages water, blood, and testimony are mentioned. The Spirit is also mentioned in 1 John 5:7 as the source of the testimony, while here the testimony comes from one of the disciples (19:35). The connection between the Spirit and the living water with Jesus’ statement of thirst just before he died in the preceding context has already been noted (see 19:28). For the author, the water which flowed out of Jesus’ side was a symbolic reference to the Holy Spirit who could now be given because Jesus was now glorified (cf. 7:39); Jesus had now departed and returned to that glory which he had with the Father before the creation of the world (cf. 17:5). The mention of blood recalls the motif of the Passover lamb as a sacrificial victim. Later references to sacrificial procedures in the Mishnah appear to support this: m. Pesahim 5:3 and 5:5 state that the blood of the sacrificial animal should not be allowed to congeal but should flow forth freely at the instant of death so that it could be used for sprinkling; m. Tamid 4:2 actually specifies that the priest is to pierce the heart of the sacrificial victim and cause the blood to come forth.

12 tn The word “it” is not in the Greek text but is implied. Direct objects were often omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

13 tn Grk “and that one.”

14 sn A parenthetical note by the author.

15 sn A quotation from Exod 12:46, Num 9:12, and Ps 34:20. A number of different OT passages lie behind this quotation: Exod 12:10 LXX, Exod 12:46, Num 9:12, or Ps 34:20. Of these, the first is the closest in form to the quotation here. The first three are all more likely candidates than the last, since the first three all deal with descriptions of the Passover lamb.

16 sn A quotation from Zech 12:10. Here a single phrase is quoted from Zech 12, but the entire context is associated with the events surrounding the crucifixion. The “Spirit of grace and of supplication” is poured out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem in the first part of v. 10. A few verses later in 13:1 Yahweh (typically rendered as “Lord” in the OT) says “In that day a fountain will be opened for the house of David and for the inhabitants of Jerusalem, for sin and for impurity.” The blood which flowed from Jesus’ pierced side may well be what the author saw as the connection here, since as the shedding of the blood of the sacrificial victim it represents cleansing from sin. Although the Jewish authorities and Roman soldiers certainly “looked on the one whom they have pierced” as he hung on the cross, the author may also have in mind the parousia (second coming) here. The context in Zech 12-14 is certainly the second coming, so that these who crucified Jesus will look upon him in another sense when he returns in judgment.

17 tn Or “the Jewish authorities”; Grk “the Jews.” Here the phrase refers to the Jewish leaders, especially the Pharisees (see John 12:42). See also the note on the phrase “Jewish leaders” in v. 7.

18 sn This is a parenthetical note by the author.

19 tn Grk “And Pilate.” The conjunction καί (kai, “and”) has not been translated here in keeping with the tendency of contemporary English style to use shorter sentences.

20 tn Grk “took away his body.”

21 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

22 sn See John 3:1-21.

23 tn Grk “came”; the words “accompanied Joseph” are not in the Greek text but are supplied for clarity.

24 sn Aloes refers to an aromatic resin from a plant similar to a lily, used for embalming a corpse.

25 sn The Roman pound (λίτρα, litra) weighed twelve ounces or 325 grams. Thus 100 Roman pounds would be about 32.5 kilograms or 75 pounds.

26 tn On this term see BDAG 140-41 s.v. ἄρωμα. The Jews did not practice embalming, so these materials were used to cover the stench of decay and slow decomposition.

27 tn The Fourth Gospel uses ὀθονίοις (oqonioi") to describe the wrappings, and this has caused a good deal of debate, since it appears to contradict the synoptic accounts which mention a σινδών (sindwn), a large single piece of linen cloth. If one understands ὀθονίοις to refer to smaller strips of cloth, like bandages, there would be a difference, but diminutive forms have often lost their diminutive force in Koine Greek (BDF §111.3), so there may not be any difference.

28 tn Grk “cloth as is the custom of the Jews to prepare for burial.”

29 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

30 sn See the note on Crucify in 19:6.

31 tn Or “an orchard.”

32 tn Or “orchard.”

33 tn Grk “been placed.”

34 sn The day of preparation was the day before the Sabbath when everything had to be prepared for it, as no work could be done on the Sabbath.

35 sn The tomb was nearby. The Passover and the Sabbath would begin at 6 p.m., so those who had come to prepare and bury the body could not afford to waste time.



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