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Genesis 18:6-8

Context

18:6 So Abraham hurried into the tent and said to Sarah, “Quick! Take 1  three measures 2  of fine flour, knead it, and make bread.” 3  18:7 Then Abraham ran to the herd and chose a fine, tender calf, and gave it to a servant, 4  who quickly prepared it. 5  18:8 Abraham 6  then took some curds and milk, along with the calf that had been prepared, and placed the food 7  before them. They ate while 8  he was standing near them under a tree.

Genesis 25:34

Context

25:34 Then Jacob gave Esau some bread and lentil stew; Esau ate and drank, then got up and went out. 9  So Esau despised his birthright. 10 

Genesis 27:3-4

Context
27:3 Therefore, take your weapons – your quiver and your bow – and go out into the open fields and hunt down some wild game 11  for me. 27:4 Then prepare for me some tasty food, the kind I love, and bring it to me. Then 12  I will eat it so that I may bless you 13  before I die.”

Genesis 43:11

Context

43:11 Then their father Israel said to them, “If it must be so, then do this: Take some of the best products of the land in your bags, and take a gift down to the man – a little balm and a little honey, spices and myrrh, pistachios and almonds.

1 tn The word “take” is supplied in the translation for stylistic reasons. In the Hebrew text the sentence lacks a verb other than the imperative “hurry.” The elliptical structure of the language reflects Abraham’s haste to get things ready quickly.

2 sn Three measures (Heb “three seahs”) was equivalent to about twenty quarts (twenty-two liters) of flour, which would make a lot of bread. The animal prepared for the meal was far more than the three visitors needed. This was a banquet for royalty. Either it had been a lonely time for Abraham and the presence of visitors made him very happy, or he sensed this was a momentous visit.

3 sn The bread was the simple, round bread made by bedouins that is normally prepared quickly for visitors.

4 tn Heb “the young man.”

5 tn The construction uses the Piel preterite, “he hurried,” followed by the infinitive construct; the two probably form a verbal hendiadys: “he quickly prepared.”

6 tn Heb “he”; the referent (Abraham) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

7 tn The words “the food” are supplied in the translation for stylistic reasons. In the Hebrew text the verb has no stated object.

8 tn The disjunctive clause is a temporal circumstantial clause subordinate to the main verb.

9 sn The style here is typical of Hebrew narrative; after the tension is resolved with the dialogue, the working out of it is recorded in a rapid sequence of verbs (“gave”; “ate”; “drank”; “got up”; “went out”). See also Gen 3:1-7 for another example.

10 sn So Esau despised his birthright. This clause, which concludes the episode, is a summary statement which reveals the underlying significance of Esau’s actions. “To despise” means to treat something as worthless or with contempt. Esau’s willingness to sell his birthright was evidence that he considered it to be unimportant.

11 tn The Hebrew word is to be spelled either צַיִד (tsayid) following the marginal reading (Qere), or צֵידָה (tsedah) following the consonantal text (Kethib). Either way it is from the same root as the imperative צוּדָה (tsudah, “hunt down”).

12 tn Following the imperative, the cohortative (with the prefixed conjunction) indicates purpose or result.

13 tn Heb “so that my soul may bless you.” The use of נַפְשִׁי (nafshi, “my soul”) as the subject emphasizes that the blessing will be made with all Isaac’s desire and vitality. The conjunction “so that” closely relates the meal to the blessing, suggesting that this will be a ritual meal in conjunction with the giving of a formal blessing.



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