NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Exodus 15:23-24

Context
15:23 Then they came to Marah, 1  but they were not able to drink 2  the waters of Marah, because 3  they were bitter. 4  (That is 5  why its name was 6  Marah.)

15:24 So the people murmured 7  against Moses, saying, “What can 8  we drink?”

1 sn The Hebrew word “Marah” means “bitter.” This motif will be repeated four times in this passage to mark the central problem. Earlier in the book the word had been used for the “bitter herbs” in the Passover, recalling the bitter labor in bondage. So there may be a double reference here – to the bitter waters and to Egypt itself – God can deliver from either.

2 tn The infinitive construct here provides the direct object for the verb “to be able,” answering the question of what they were not able to do.

3 tn The causal clause here provides the reason for their being unable to drink the water, as well as a clear motivation for the name.

4 sn Many scholars have attempted to explain these things with natural phenomena. Here Marah is identified with Ain Hawarah. It is said that the waters of this well are notoriously salty and brackish; Robinson said it was six to eight feet in diameter and the water about two feet deep; the water is unpleasant, salty, and somewhat bitter. As a result the Arabs say it is the worst tasting water in the area (W. C. Kaiser, Jr., “Exodus,” EBC 2:398). But that would not be a sufficient amount of water for the number of Israelites in the first place, and in the second, they could not drink it at all. But third, how did Moses change it?

5 tn The עַל־כֵּן (’al-ken) formula in the Pentateuch serves to explain to the reader the reason for the way things were. It does not necessarily mean here that Israel named the place – but they certainly could have.

6 tn Heb “one called its name,” the expression can be translated as a passive verb if the subject is not expressed.

7 tn The verb וַיִּלֹנוּ (vayyillonu) from לוּן (lun) is a much stronger word than “to grumble” or “to complain.” It is used almost exclusively in the wilderness wandering stories, to describe the rebellion of the Israelites against God (see also Ps 59:14-15). They were not merely complaining – they were questioning God’s abilities and motives. The action is something like a parliamentary vote of no confidence.

8 tn The imperfect tense here should be given a potential nuance: “What can we drink?” since the previous verse reports that they were not able to drink the water.

sn It is likely that Moses used words very much like this when he prayed. The difference seems to lie in the prepositions – he cried “to” Yahweh, but the people murmured “against” Moses.



TIP #05: Try Double Clicking on any word for instant search. [ALL]
created in 0.05 seconds
powered by bible.org