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Acts 9:20

Context
9:20 and immediately he began to proclaim Jesus in the synagogues, 1  saying, “This man is the Son of God.” 2 

Acts 13:5

Context
13:5 When 3  they arrived 4  in Salamis, 5  they began to proclaim 6  the word of God in the Jewish synagogues. 7  (Now they also had John 8  as their assistant.) 9 

Acts 17:1

Context
Paul and Silas at Thessalonica

17:1 After they traveled through 10  Amphipolis 11  and Apollonia, 12  they came to Thessalonica, 13  where there was a Jewish synagogue. 14 

Acts 17:17

Context
17:17 So he was addressing 15  the Jews and the God-fearing Gentiles 16  in the synagogue, 17  and in the marketplace every day 18  those who happened to be there.

Acts 18:4

Context
18:4 He addressed 19  both Jews and Greeks in the synagogue 20  every Sabbath, attempting to persuade 21  them.

1 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

2 tn The ὅτι (Joti) is understood to introduce direct (“This man is the Son of God”) rather than indirect discourse (“that this man is the Son of God”) because the pronoun οὗτος (Jouto") combined with the present tense verb ἐστιν (estin) suggests the contents of what was proclaimed are a direct (albeit summarized) quotation.

sn This is the only use of the title Son of God in Acts. The book prefers to allow a variety of descriptions to present Jesus.

3 tn Grk “And when.” Because of the difference between Greek style, which often begins sentences or clauses with “and,” and English style, which generally does not, καί (kai) has not been translated here.

4 tn The participle γενόμενοι (genomenoi) is taken temporally.

5 sn Salamis was a city on the southeastern coast of the island of Cyprus. This was a commercial center and a center of Judaism.

6 tn The imperfect verb κατήγγελλον (kathngellon) has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

7 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

8 sn John refers here to John Mark (see Acts 12:25).

9 tn The word ὑπηρέτης (Juphreth") usually has the meaning “servant,” but it is doubtful John Mark fulfilled that capacity for Barnabas and Saul. He was more likely an apprentice or assistant to them.

sn This is a parenthetical note by the author.

10 tn BDAG 250 s.v. διοδεύω 1 has “go, travel through” for this verse.

11 sn Amphipolis. The capital city of the southeastern district of Macedonia (BDAG 55 s.v. ᾿Αμφίπολις). It was a military post. From Philippi this was about 33 mi (53 km).

12 sn Apollonia was a city in Macedonia about 27 mi (43 km) west southwest of Amphipolis.

13 sn Thessalonica (modern Salonica) was a city in Macedonia about 33 mi (53 km) west of Apollonia. It was the capital of Macedonia. The road they traveled over was called the Via Egnatia. It is likely they rode horses, given their condition in Philippi. The implication of v. 1 is that the two previously mentioned cities lacked a synagogue.

map For location see JP1 C1; JP2 C1; JP3 C1; JP4 C1.

14 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

15 tn Although the word διελέξατο (dielexato; from διαλέγομαι, dialegomai) is frequently translated “reasoned,” “disputed,” or “argued,” this sense comes from its classical meaning where it was used of philosophical disputation, including the Socratic method of questions and answers. However, there does not seem to be contextual evidence for this kind of debate in Acts 17:17. As G. Schrenk (TDNT 2:94-95) points out, “What is at issue is the address which any qualified member of a synagogue might give.” Other examples of this may be found in the NT in Matt 4:23 and Mark 1:21.

16 tn Or “and the devout,” but this is practically a technical term for the category called God-fearers, Gentiles who worshiped the God of Israel and in many cases kept the Mosaic law, but did not take the final step of circumcision necessary to become a proselyte to Judaism. See further K. G. Kuhn, TDNT 6:732-34, 743-44, and the note on the phrase “God-fearing Greeks” in 17:4.

17 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

18 tn BDAG 437 s.v. ἡμέρα 2.c has “every day” for this phrase in this verse.

19 tn Although the word διελέξατο (dielexato; from διαλέγομαι, dialegomai) is frequently translated “reasoned,” “disputed,” or “argued,” this sense comes from its classical meaning where it was used of philosophical disputation, including the Socratic method of questions and answers. However, there does not seem to be contextual evidence for this kind of debate in Acts 18:4. As G. Schrenk (TDNT 2:94-95) points out, “What is at issue is the address which any qualified member of a synagogue might give.” Other examples of this may be found in the NT in Matt 4:23 and Mark 1:21.

20 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

21 tn Grk “Addressing in the synagogue every Sabbath, he was attempting to persuade both Jews and Greeks.” Because in English the verb “address” is not used absolutely but normally has an object specified, the direct objects of the verb ἔπειθεν (epeiqen) have been moved forward as the objects of the English verb “addressed,” and the pronoun “them” repeated in the translation as the object of ἔπειθεν. The verb ἔπειθεν has been translated as a conative imperfect.



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