NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Acts 19:1-12

Context
Disciples of John the Baptist at Ephesus

19:1 While 1  Apollos was in Corinth, 2  Paul went through the inland 3  regions 4  and came to Ephesus. 5  He 6  found some disciples there 7  19:2 and said to them, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” 8  They replied, 9  “No, we have not even 10  heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” 19:3 So Paul 11  said, “Into what then were you baptized?” “Into John’s baptism,” they replied. 12  19:4 Paul said, “John baptized with a baptism of repentance, telling the people to believe in the one who was to come after him, 13  that is, in Jesus.” 19:5 When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus, 19:6 and when Paul placed 14  his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came 15  upon them, and they began to speak 16  in tongues and to prophesy. 17  19:7 (Now there were about twelve men in all.) 18 

Paul Continues to Minister at Ephesus

19:8 So Paul 19  entered 20  the synagogue 21  and spoke out fearlessly 22  for three months, addressing 23  and convincing 24  them about the kingdom of God. 25  19:9 But when 26  some were stubborn 27  and refused to believe, reviling 28  the Way 29  before the congregation, he left 30  them and took the disciples with him, 31  addressing 32  them every day 33  in the lecture hall 34  of Tyrannus. 19:10 This went on for two years, so that all who lived in the province of Asia, 35  both Jews and Greeks, heard the word of the Lord. 36 

The Seven Sons of Sceva

19:11 God was performing extraordinary 37  miracles by Paul’s hands, 19:12 so that when even handkerchiefs or aprons that had touched his body 38  were brought 39  to the sick, their diseases left them and the evil spirits went out of them. 40 

1 tn Grk “It happened that while.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

2 map For location see JP1 C2; JP2 C2; JP3 C2; JP4 C2.

3 tn Or “interior.”

4 tn BDAG 92 s.v. ἀνωτερικός has “upper τὰ ἀ. μέρη the upper (i.e. inland) country, the interior Ac 19:1.”

5 map For location see JP1 D2; JP2 D2; JP3 D2; JP4 D2.

6 tn Grk “and found.” Because of the length of the Greek sentence and the sequencing with the following verse the conjunction καί (kai) has not been translated here. Instead a new English sentence is begun.

7 tn The word “there” is not in the Greek text but is implied.

8 tn The participle πιστεύσαντες (pisteusante") is taken temporally.

9 tn Grk “they [said] to him” (the word “said” is implied in the Greek text).

10 tn This use of ἀλλά (alla) is ascensive and involves an ellipsis (BDAG 45 s.v. ἀλλά 3): “No, [not only did we not receive the Spirit,] but also we have not heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” However, this is lengthy and somewhat awkward in English, and the ascensive meaning can be much more easily represented by including the word “even” after the negation. Apparently these disciples were unaware of the provision of the Spirit that is represented in baptism. The language sounds like they did not know about a Holy Spirit, but this seems to be only linguistic shorthand for not knowing about the Spirit’s presence (Luke 3:15-18). The situation is parallel to that of Apollos. Apollos and these disciples represent those who “complete” their transition to messianic faith as Jews.

11 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Paul) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

12 tn Grk “they said.”

13 sn These disciples may have had their contact with John early on in the Baptist’s ministry before Jesus had emerged. This is the fifth time Luke links John the Baptist and Jesus (Acts 1:5; 11:16; 13:25; 18:25).

14 tn Or “laid.”

15 sn The coming of the Holy Spirit here is another case where the Spirit comes and prophesy results in Acts (see Acts 2). Paul’s action parallels that of Peter (Acts 8) and not just with Gentiles.

16 tn The imperfect verb ἐλάλουν (elaloun) has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

17 tn The imperfect verb ἐπροφήτευον (eprofhteuon) has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

18 sn This is a parenthetical note by the author.

19 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Paul) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

20 tn Grk “So entering the synagogue, he spoke out fearlessly.” The participle εἰσελθών (eiselqwn) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

21 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

22 tn Or “boldly.”

23 tn Although the word διελέξατο (dielexato; from διαλέγομαι, dialegomai) is frequently translated “reasoned,” “disputed,” or “argued,” this sense comes from its classical meaning where it was used of philosophical disputation, including the Socratic method of questions and answers. However, there does not seem to be contextual evidence for this kind of debate in Acts 19:8. As G. Schrenk (TDNT 2:94-95) points out, “What is at issue is the address which any qualified member of a synagogue might give.” Other examples of this may be found in the NT in Matt 4:23 and Mark 1:21.

24 tn Or “addressing them persuasively.” The two participles διαλεγόμενος and πείθων (dialegomeno" and peiqwn) can be understood as a hendiadys (so NIV, NRSV), thus, “addressing them persuasively.”

25 sn To talk about Jesus as the Christ who has come is to talk about the kingdom of God. This is yet another summary of the message like that in 18:28.

26 tn BDAG 1105-6 s.v. ὡς 8.b lists this use as a temporal conjunction.

27 tn Or “some became hardened.” See BDAG 930 s.v. σκληρύνω b and Acts 7:51-53.

28 tn Or “speaking evil of.” BDAG 500 s.v. κακολογέω has “speak evil of, revile, insultτὶ someth. τὴν ὁδόν the Way (i.e. Christian way of life) Ac 19:9.”

29 sn The Way refers to the Christian movement (Christianity). Luke frequently refers to it as “the Way” (Acts 9:2; 18:25-26; 19:23; 22:4; 24:14, 22).

30 tn Grk “leaving them, he took.” The participle ἀποστάς (apostas) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

31 tn The words “with him” are not in the Greek text, but are implied.

32 tn Although the word διελέξατο (dielexato; from διαλέγομαι, dialegomai) is frequently translated “reasoned,” “disputed,” or “argued,” this sense comes from its classical meaning where it was used of philosophical disputation, including the Socratic method of questions and answers. However, there does not seem to be contextual evidence for this kind of debate in Acts 19:9. As G. Schrenk (TDNT 2:94-95) points out, “What is at issue is the address which any qualified member of a synagogue might give.” Other examples of this may be found in the NT in Matt 4:23 and Mark 1:21.

33 tn BDAG 437 s.v. ἡμέρα 2.c has “every day” for this phrase in this verse.

34 tn The “lecture hall” was a place where teachers and pupils met. The term is a NT hapax legomenon (BDAG 982 s.v. σχολή). L&N 7.14 notes, “it is better to use a translation such as ‘lecture hall’ rather than ‘school,’ since one does not wish to give the impression of the typical classroom situation characteristic of present-day schools.”

35 tn Grk “Asia”; in the NT this always refers to the Roman province of Asia, made up of about one-third of the west and southwest end of modern Asia Minor. Asia lay to the west of the region of Phrygia and Galatia. The words “the province of” are supplied to indicate to the modern reader that this does not refer to the continent of Asia.

sn The expression all who lived in the province of Asia is good Semitic hyperbole (see Col 1:7, “all the world”). The message was now available to the region.

36 sn The word of the Lord is a technical expression in OT literature, often referring to a divine prophetic utterance (e.g., Gen 15:1, Isa 1:10, Jonah 1:1). In the NT it occurs 15 times: 3 times as ῥῆμα τοῦ κυρίου (rJhma tou kuriou; Luke 22:61, Acts 11:16, 1 Pet 1:25) and 12 times as λόγος τοῦ κυρίου (logo" tou kuriou; here and in Acts 8:25; 13:44, 48, 49; 15:35, 36; 16:32; 19:20; 1 Thess 1:8, 4:15; 2 Thess 3:1). As in the OT, this phrase focuses on the prophetic nature and divine origin of what has been said.

37 tn BDAG 1019 s.v. τυγχάνω 2.d states, “δυνάμεις οὐ τὰς τυχούσας extraordinary miracles Ac 19:11.”

38 tn Or “skin” (the outer surface of the body).

39 tn Or “were taken.” It might be that as word went out into the region that since the sick could not come to Paul, healing was brought to them this way. The “handkerchiefs” are probably face cloths for wiping perspiration (see BDAG 934 s.v. σουδάριον) while the “aprons” might be material worn by workmen (BDAG 923-24 s.v. σιμικίνθιον).

40 tn The words “of them” are not in the Greek text, but are implied.



TIP #26: To open links on Discovery Box in a new window, use the right click. [ALL]
created in 0.11 seconds
powered by bible.org