NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Acts 10:9-16

Context

10:9 About noon 1  the next day, while they were on their way and approaching 2  the city, Peter went up on the roof 3  to pray. 10:10 He became hungry and wanted to eat, but while they were preparing the meal, a trance came over him. 4  10:11 He 5  saw heaven 6  opened 7  and an object something like a large sheet 8  descending, 9  being let down to earth 10  by its four corners. 10:12 In it 11  were all kinds of four-footed animals and reptiles 12  of the earth and wild birds. 13  10:13 Then 14  a voice said 15  to him, “Get up, Peter; slaughter 16  and eat!” 10:14 But Peter said, “Certainly not, Lord, for I have never eaten anything defiled and ritually unclean!” 17  10:15 The voice 18  spoke to him again, a second time, “What God has made clean, you must not consider 19  ritually unclean!” 20  10:16 This happened three times, and immediately the object was taken up into heaven. 21 

Acts 11:1-10

Context
Peter Defends His Actions to the Jerusalem Church

11:1 Now the apostles and the brothers who were throughout Judea heard that the Gentiles too had accepted 22  the word of God. 23  11:2 So when Peter went up to Jerusalem, 24  the circumcised believers 25  took issue with 26  him, 11:3 saying, “You went to 27  uncircumcised men and shared a meal with 28  them.” 11:4 But Peter began and explained it to them point by point, 29  saying, 11:5 “I was in the city of Joppa praying, and in a trance I saw a vision, 30  an object something like a large sheet descending, 31  being let down from heaven 32  by its four corners, and it came to me. 11:6 As I stared 33  I looked into it and saw four-footed animals of the earth, wild animals, reptiles, 34  and wild birds. 35  11:7 I also heard a voice saying to me, ‘Get up, Peter; slaughter 36  and eat!’ 11:8 But I said, ‘Certainly not, Lord, for nothing defiled or ritually unclean 37  has ever entered my mouth!’ 11:9 But the voice replied a second time from heaven, ‘What God has made clean, you must not consider 38  ritually unclean!’ 11:10 This happened three times, and then everything was pulled up to heaven again.

1 tn Grk “about the sixth hour.”

2 tn The participles ὁδοιπορούντων (Jodoiporountwn, “while they were on their way”) and ἐγγιζόντων (engizontwn, “approaching”) have been translated as temporal participles.

3 sn Went up on the roof. Most of the roofs in the NT were flat roofs made of pounded dirt, sometimes mixed with lime or stones, supported by heavy wooden beams. They generally had an easy means of access, either a sturdy wooden ladder or stone stairway, sometimes on the outside of the house.

4 tn The traditional translation, “he fell into a trance,” is somewhat idiomatic; it is based on the textual variant ἐπέπεσεν (epepesen, “he fell”) found in the Byzantine text but almost certainly not original.

5 tn Grk “And he.” Because of the length of the Greek sentence, the conjunction καί (kai) has not been translated here. Instead a new English sentence is begun.

6 tn Or “the sky” (the same Greek word means both “heaven” and “sky”).

7 tn On the heavens “opening,” see Matt 3:16; Luke 3:21; Rev 19:11 (cf. BDAG 84 s.v. ἀνοίγω 2). This is the language of a vision or a revelatory act of God.

8 tn Or “a large linen cloth” (the term was used for the sail of a ship; BDAG 693 s.v. ὀθόνη).

9 tn Or “coming down.”

10 tn Or “to the ground.”

11 tn Grk “in which.” The relative pronoun was replaced by the pronoun “it,” and a new sentence was begun in the translation at this point to improve the English style.

12 tn Or “snakes.” Grk “creeping things.” According to L&N 4.51, in most biblical contexts the term (due to the influence of Hebrew classifications such as Gen 1:25-26, 30) included small four-footed animals like rats, mice, frogs, toads, salamanders, and lizards. In this context, however, where “creeping things” are contrasted with “four-footed animals,” the English word “reptiles,” which primarily but not exclusively designates snakes, is probably more appropriate. See also Gen 6:20, as well as the law making such creatures unclean food in Lev 11:2-47.

13 tn Grk “the birds of the sky” or “the birds of the heaven”; the Greek word οὐρανός (ouranos) may be translated either “sky” or “heaven,” depending on the context. The idiomatic expression “birds of the sky” refers to wild birds as opposed to domesticated fowl (cf. BDAG 809 s.v. πετεινόν).

14 tn Grk “And there came.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

15 tn Grk “a voice to him”; the word “said” is not in the Greek text but is implied.

16 tn Or “kill.” Traditionally θῦσον (quson) is translated “kill,” but in the case of animals intended for food, “slaughter” is more appropriate.

17 tn Possibly there is a subtle distinction in meaning between κοινός (koinos) and ἀκάθαρτος (akaqarto") here, but according to L&N 53.39 it is difficult to determine precise differences in meaning based on existing contexts.

sn Peter insisted he would not violate the law by eating anything defiled and ritually unclean. These food laws were one of the practices that distinguished Jews from their Gentile neighbors. The practice made table fellowship with Gentiles awkward. For an example of Jewish attitudes to this, see Dan 1:8-16; 1 Macc 1:41-64; Letter of Aristeas 142; Tacitus, History 5.5.

18 tn Grk “And the voice.” Because of the difference between Greek style, which often begins sentences or clauses with “and,” and English style, which generally does not, καί (kai) has not been translated here.

19 tn Or “declare.”

20 sn For the significance of this vision see Mark 7:14-23; Rom 14:14; Eph 2:11-22. God directed this change in practice.

21 tn Or “into the sky” (the same Greek word means both “heaven” and “sky”).

22 tn See BDAG 221 s.v. δέχομαι 5 for this translation of ἐδέξαντο (edexanto) here.

23 tn Here the phrase “word of God” is another way to describe the gospel (note the preceding verb ἐδέξαντο, edexanto, “accepted”). The phrase could also be translated “the word [message] from God.”

24 map For location see Map5 B1; Map6 F3; Map7 E2; Map8 F2; Map10 B3; JP1 F4; JP2 F4; JP3 F4; JP4 F4.

25 tn Or “the Jewish Christians”; Grk “those of the circumcision.” Within the larger group of Christians were some whose loyalties ran along ethnic-religious lines.

26 tn Or “believers disputed with,” “believers criticized” (BDAG 231 s.v. διακρίνω 5.b).

27 tn Or “You were a guest in the home of” (according to L&N 23.12).

28 tn Or “and ate with.” It was table fellowship and the possibility of eating unclean food that disturbed them.

29 tn Or “to them in logical sequence,” “to them in order.” BDAG 490 s.v. καθεξῆς has “explain to someone point by point” for this phrase. This is the same term used in Luke 1:3.

30 tn This term describes a supernatural vision and reflects a clear distinction from something imagined (BDAG 718 s.v. ὅραμα 1). Peter repeated the story virtually word for word through v. 13. The repetition with this degree of detail shows the event’s importance.

31 tn Or “coming down.”

32 tn Or “the sky” (the same Greek word means both “heaven” and “sky”).

33 tn Grk “Staring I looked into it.” The participle ἀτενίσας (atenisa") has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

34 tn Or “snakes.” Grk “creeping things.” According to L&N 4.51, in most biblical contexts the term (due to the influence of Hebrew classifications such as Gen 1:25-26, 30) included small four-footed animals like rats, mice, frogs, toads, salamanders, and lizards. In this context, however, where “creeping things” are contrasted with “four-footed animals,” the English word “reptiles,” which primarily but not exclusively designates snakes, is probably more appropriate.

35 tn Grk “the birds of the sky” or “the birds of the heaven”; the Greek word οὐρανός (ouranos) may be translated either “sky” or “heaven,” depending on the context. The idiomatic expression “birds of the sky” refers to wild birds as opposed to domesticated fowl (cf. BDAG 809 s.v. πετεινόν).

36 tn Or “kill.” Traditionally θῦσον (quson) is translated “kill,” but in the case of animals intended for food, “slaughter” is more appropriate.

37 tn Possibly there is a subtle distinction in meaning between κοινός (koinos) and ἀκάθαρτος (akaqartos) here, but according to L&N 53.39 it is difficult to determine precise differences in meaning based on existing contexts. The sentiment Peter expressed is like Ezek 4:14.

38 tn Or “declare.” The wording matches Acts 10:15.



TIP #07: Use the Discovery Box to further explore word(s) and verse(s). [ALL]
created in 0.06 seconds
powered by bible.org