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Acts 10:2

Context
10:2 He 1  was a devout, God-fearing man, 2  as was all his household; he did many acts of charity for the people 3  and prayed to God regularly.

Acts 10:7

Context
10:7 When the angel who had spoken to him departed, Cornelius 4  called two of his personal servants 5  and a devout soldier from among those who served him, 6 

Acts 13:42-43

Context

13:42 As Paul and Barnabas 7  were going out, 8  the people 9  were urging 10  them to speak about these things 11  on the next Sabbath. 13:43 When the meeting of the synagogue 12  had broken up, 13  many of the Jews and God-fearing proselytes 14  followed Paul and Barnabas, who were speaking with them and were persuading 15  them 16  to continue 17  in the grace of God.

Acts 13:50

Context
13:50 But the Jews incited 18  the God-fearing women of high social standing and the prominent men of the city, stirred up persecution against Paul and Barnabas, and threw them out 19  of their region.

Acts 17:4

Context
17:4 Some of them were persuaded 20  and joined Paul and Silas, along with a large group 21  of God-fearing Greeks 22  and quite a few 23  prominent women.

Acts 18:7

Context
18:7 Then Paul 24  left 25  the synagogue 26  and went to the house of a person named Titius Justus, a Gentile who worshiped God, 27  whose house was next door to the synagogue.

1 tn In the Greek text this represents a continuation of the previous sentence. Because of the tendency of contemporary English to use shorter sentences, a new sentence was begun here in the translation.

2 sn The description of Cornelius as a devout, God-fearing man probably means that he belonged to the category called “God-fearers,” Gentiles who worshiped the God of Israel and in many cases kept the Mosaic law, but did not take the final step of circumcision necessary to become a proselyte to Judaism. See further K. G. Kuhn, TDNT 6:732-34, 43-44, and Sir 11:17; 27:11; 39:27.

3 tn Or “gave many gifts to the poor.” This was known as “giving alms,” or acts of mercy (Sir 7:10; BDAG 315-16 s.v. ἐλεημοσύνη).

4 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Cornelius) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

5 tn Or “domestic servants.” The Greek word here is οἰκέτης (oiketh"), which technically refers to a member of the household, but usually means a household servant (slave) or personal servant rather than a field laborer.

6 tn The meaning of the genitive participle προσκαρτερούντων (proskarterountwn) could either be “a soldier from the ranks of those who served him” (referring to his entire command) or “a soldier from among his personal staff” (referring to a group of soldiers who were his personal attendants). The translation “from among those who served him” is general enough to cover either possibility.

7 tn Grk “they”; the referents (Paul and Barnabas) have been specified in the translation for clarity.

8 tn Or “were leaving.” The participle ἐξιόντων (exiontwn) is taken temporally.

9 tn Grk “they”; the referent (the people) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

10 tn Or “begging,” “inviting.”

11 tn Or “matters.”

12 sn See the note on synagogue in 6:9.

13 tn BDAG 607 s.v. λύω 3 has “λυθείσης τ. συναγωγῆς when the meeting of the synagogue had broken up Ac 13:43.”

14 tn Normally the phrase σεβόμενοι τὸν θεόν (sebomenoi ton qeon) refers to Gentiles (“God-fearers”) who believed in God, attended the synagogue, and followed the Mosaic law to some extent, but stopped short of undergoing circumcision. BDAG 918 s.v. σέβω 1.b lists in this category references in Acts 16:14; 18:7; with σεβόμενοι alone, Acts 13:50; 17:4, 17; the phrase is also found in Josephus, Ant. 14.7.2 (14.110). Unique to this particular verse is the combination σεβόμενοι προσηλύτων (sebomenoi proshlutwn). Later rabbinic discussion suggests that to be regarded as a proper proselyte, a Gentile male had to submit to circumcision. If that is the case here, these Gentiles in the synagogue at Pisidian Antioch should be regarded as full proselytes who had converted completely to Judaism and undergone circumcision. It is probably more likely, however, that προσηλύτων is used here in a somewhat looser sense (note the use of σεβομένας [sebomena"] alone to refer to women in Acts 13:50) and that these Gentiles were still in the category commonly called “God-fearers” without being full, technical proselytes to Judaism. See further K. G. Kuhn, TDNT 6:732-34, 743-44. Regardless, the point is that many Gentiles, as well as Jews, came to faith.

15 tn This is the meaning given for ἔπειθον (epeiqon) in this verse by BDAG 791 s.v. πείθω 1.b.

16 tn Grk “who, as they were speaking with them, were persuading them.”

17 tn The verb προμένειν (promenein) is similar in force to the use of μένω (menw, “to reside/remain”) in the Gospel and Epistles of John.

18 tn For the translation of παρώτρυναν (parwtrunan) as “incited” see BDAG 780 s.v. παροτρύνω.

19 tn BDAG 299 s.v. ἐκβάλλω 1 has “throw out.” Once again, many Jews reacted to the message (Acts 5:17, 33; 6:11; 13:45).

20 tn Or “convinced.”

21 tn Or “a large crowd.”

22 tn Or “of devout Greeks,” but this is practically a technical term for the category called God-fearers, Gentiles who worshiped the God of Israel and in many cases kept the Mosaic law, but did not take the final step of circumcision necessary to become a proselyte to Judaism. See further K. G. Kuhn, TDNT 6:732-34, 743-44. Luke frequently mentions such people (Acts 13:43, 50; 16:14; 17:17; 18:7).

23 tn Grk “not a few”; this use of negation could be misleading to the modern English reader, however, and so has been translated as “quite a few” (which is the actual meaning of the expression).

24 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Paul) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

25 tn Grk “Then leaving from there he went.” The participle μεταβάς (metabas) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

26 tn Grk “from there”; the referent (the synagogue) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

27 tn Grk “a worshiper of God.” The clarifying phrase “a Gentile” has been supplied for clarity, and is indicated by the context, since Paul had parted company with the Jews in the previous verse. The participle σεβομένου (sebomenou) is practically a technical term for the category called God-fearers, Gentiles who worshiped the God of Israel and in many cases kept the Mosaic law, but did not take the final step of circumcision necessary to become a proselyte to Judaism. See further K. G. Kuhn, TDNT 6:732-34, 743-44.

sn Here yet another Gentile is presented as responsive to Paul’s message in Acts.



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