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Psalms 7:1-2

Context
Psalm 7 1 

A musical composition 2  by David, which he sang to the Lord concerning 3  a Benjaminite named Cush. 4 

7:1 O Lord my God, in you I have taken shelter. 5 

Deliver me from all who chase me! Rescue me!

7:2 Otherwise they will rip 6  me 7  to shreds like a lion;

they will tear me to bits and no one will be able to rescue me. 8 

Psalms 13:3-4

Context

13:3 Look at me! 9  Answer me, O Lord my God!

Revive me, 10  or else I will die! 11 

13:4 Then 12  my enemy will say, “I have defeated him!”

Then 13  my foes will rejoice because I am upended.

Psalms 28:1

Context
Psalm 28 14 

By David.

28:1 To you, O Lord, I cry out!

My protector, 15  do not ignore me! 16 

If you do not respond to me, 17 

I will join 18  those who are descending into the grave. 19 

1 sn Psalm 7. The psalmist asks the Lord to intervene and deliver him from his enemies. He protests his innocence and declares his confidence in God’s justice.

2 tn The precise meaning of the Hebrew term שִׁגָּיוֹן (shiggayon; translated here “musical composition”) is uncertain. Some derive the noun from the verbal root שָׁגָה (shagah, “swerve, reel”) and understand it as referring to a “wild, passionate song, with rapid changes of rhythm” (see BDB 993 s.v. שִׁגָּיוֹן). But this proposal is purely speculative. The only other appearance of the noun is in Hab 3:1, where it occurs in the plural.

3 tn Or “on account of.”

4 sn Apparently this individual named Cush was one of David’s enemies.

5 tn The Hebrew perfect verbal form probably refers here to a completed action with continuing results.

6 tn The verb is singular in the Hebrew text, even though “all who chase me” in v. 1 refers to a whole group of enemies. The singular is also used in vv. 4-5, but the psalmist returns to the plural in v. 6. The singular is probably collective, emphasizing the united front that the psalmist’s enemies present. This same alternation between a collective singular and a plural referring to enemies appears in Pss 9:3, 6; 13:4; 31:4, 8; 41:6, 10-11; 42:9-10; 55:3; 64:1-2; 74:3-4; 89:22-23; 106:10-11; 143:3, 6, 9.

7 tn Heb “my life.” The pronominal suffix attached to נֶפֶשׁ (nefesh) is equivalent to a personal pronoun. See Ps 6:3.

8 tn Heb “tearing and there is no one rescuing.” The verbal form translated “tearing” is a singular active participle.

9 tn Heb “see.”

10 tn Heb “Give light [to] my eyes.” The Hiphil of אוּר (’ur), when used elsewhere with “eyes” as object, refers to the law of God giving moral enlightenment (Ps 19:8), to God the creator giving literal eyesight to all people (Prov 29:13), and to God giving encouragement to his people (Ezra 9:8). Here the psalmist pictures himself as being on the verge of death. His eyes are falling shut and, if God does not intervene soon, he will “fall asleep” for good.

11 tn Heb “or else I will sleep [in?] the death.” Perhaps the statement is elliptical, “I will sleep [the sleep] of death,” or “I will sleep [with the sleepers in] death.”

12 tn Heb “or else.”

13 tn Heb “or else.”

14 sn Psalm 28. The author looks to the Lord for vindication, asks that the wicked be repaid in full for their evil deeds, and affirms his confidence that the Lord will protect his own.

15 tn Heb “my rocky summit.” The Lord is compared to a rocky summit where one can find protection from enemies. See Ps 18:2.

16 tn Heb “do not be deaf from me.”

17 tn Heb “lest [if] you are silent from me.”

18 tn Heb “I will be equal with.”

19 tn Heb “the pit.” The noun בּוֹר (bor, “pit, cistern”) is sometimes used of the grave and/or the realm of the dead.



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