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Psalms 4:1

Context
Psalm 4 1 

For the music director, to be accompanied by stringed instruments; a psalm of David.

4:1 When I call out, answer me,

O God who vindicates me! 2 

Though I am hemmed in, you will lead me into a wide, open place. 3 

Have mercy on me 4  and respond to 5  my prayer!

Psalms 6:1

Context
Psalm 6 6 

For the music director, to be accompanied by stringed instruments, according to the sheminith style; 7  a psalm of David.

6:1 Lord, do not rebuke me in your anger!

Do not discipline me in your raging fury! 8 

Psalms 54:1

Context
Psalm 54 9 

For the music director, to be accompanied by stringed instruments; a well-written song 10  by David. It was written when the Ziphites came and informed Saul: “David is hiding with us.” 11 

54:1 O God, deliver me by your name! 12 

Vindicate me 13  by your power!

Psalms 55:1

Context
Psalm 55 14 

For the music director, to be accompanied by stringed instruments; a well-written song 15  by David.

55:1 Listen, O God, to my prayer!

Do not ignore 16  my appeal for mercy!

Psalms 67:1

Context
Psalm 67 17 

For the music director; to be accompanied by stringed instruments; a psalm, a song.

67:1 May God show us his favor 18  and bless us! 19 

May he smile on us! 20  (Selah)

Psalms 76:1

Context
Psalm 76 21 

For the music director; to be accompanied by stringed instruments; a psalm of Asaph, a song.

76:1 God has revealed himself in Judah; 22 

in Israel his reputation 23  is great.

1 sn Psalm 4. The psalmist asks God to hear his prayer, expresses his confidence that the Lord will intervene, and urges his enemies to change their ways and place their trust in God. He concludes with another prayer for divine intervention and again affirms his absolute confidence in God’s protection.

2 tn Heb “God of my righteousness.”

3 tn Heb “in distress (or “a narrow place”) you make (a place) large for me.” The function of the Hebrew perfect verbal form here is uncertain. The translation above assumes that the psalmist is expressing his certitude and confidence that God will intervene. The psalmist is so confident of God’s positive response to his prayer, he can describe God’s deliverance as if it had already happened. Such confidence is consistent with the mood of the psalm (vv. 3, 8). Another option is to take the perfects as precative, expressing a wish or request (“lead me”). See IBHS 494-95 §30.5.4c, d. However, not all grammarians are convinced that the perfect is used as a precative in biblical Hebrew.

4 tn Or “show me favor.”

5 tn Heb “hear.”

6 sn Psalm 6. The psalmist begs the Lord to withdraw his anger and spare his life. Having received a positive response to his prayer, the psalmist then confronts his enemies and describes how they retreat.

7 tn The meaning of the Hebrew term שְׁמִינִית (shÿminit, “sheminith”) is uncertain; perhaps it refers to a particular style of music. See 1 Chr 15:21.

8 sn The implication is that the psalmist has sinned, causing God to discipline him by bringing a life-threatening illness upon him (see vv. 2-7).

9 sn Psalm 54. The psalmist asks God for protection against his enemies, confidently affirms that God will vindicate him, and promises to give thanks to God for his saving intervention.

10 tn The meaning of the Hebrew term מַשְׂכִּיל (maskil) is uncertain. See the note on the phrase “well-written song” in the superscription of Ps 52.

11 tn Heb “Is not David hiding with us?”

sn According to the superscription, David wrote this psalm during the period when Saul was seeking his life. On one occasion the Ziphites informed Saul that David was hiding in their territory (see 1 Sam 23:19-20).

12 tn God’s “name” refers here to his reputation and revealed character, which would instill fear in the psalmist’s enemies (see C. A. Briggs and E. G. Briggs, Psalms [ICC], 2:17).

13 tn The imperfect verbal form is used here to express the psalmist’s wish or request.

14 sn Psalm 55. The suffering and oppressed author laments that one of his friends has betrayed him, but he is confident that God will vindicate him by punishing his deceitful enemies.

15 tn The meaning of the Hebrew term מַשְׂכִּיל (maskil) is uncertain. See the note on the phrase “well-written song” in the superscription of Ps 52.

16 tn Heb “hide yourself from.”

17 sn Psalm 67. The psalmist prays for God’s blessing upon his people and urges the nations to praise him for he is the just ruler of the world.

18 tn Or “have mercy on us.”

19 tn The prefixed verbal forms are understood as jussives expressing the psalmist’s prayer. Note the jussive form יָאֵר (yaer) in the next line.

20 tn Heb “may he cause his face to shine with us.”

21 sn Psalm 76. The psalmist depicts God as a mighty warrior who destroys Israel’s enemies.

22 tn Or “God is known in Judah.”

23 tn Heb “name,” which here stands metonymically for God’s reputation.



TIP #08: Use the Strong Number links to learn about the original Hebrew and Greek text. [ALL]
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