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Psalms 43:4

Context

43:4 Then I will go 1  to the altar of God,

to the God who gives me ecstatic joy, 2 

so that I express my thanks to you, 3  O God, my God, with a harp.

Psalms 48:8

Context

48:8 We heard about God’s mighty deeds, now we have seen them, 4 

in the city of the Lord, the invincible Warrior, 5 

in the city of our God.

God makes it permanently secure. 6  (Selah)

Psalms 48:14

Context

48:14 For God, our God, is our defender forever! 7 

He guides 8  us! 9 

Psalms 50:7

Context

50:7 He says: 10 

“Listen my people! I am speaking!

Listen Israel! I am accusing you! 11 

I am God, your God!

Psalms 51:14

Context

51:14 Rescue me from the guilt of murder, 12  O God, the God who delivers me!

Then my tongue will shout for joy because of your deliverance. 13 

Psalms 67:7

Context

67:7 May God bless us! 14 

Then all the ends of the earth will give him the honor he deserves. 15 

1 tn The cohortative expresses the psalmist’s resolve. Prefixed with the vav (ו) conjunctive it also expresses the result or outcome of the preceding verbs “lead” and “escort.”

2 tn Heb “to God, the joy of my happiness.” The phrase “joy of my happiness” employs an appositional genitive. Synonyms are joined in a construct relationship to emphasize the degree of the psalmist’s joy. For a detailed discussion of the grammatical point with numerous examples, see Y. Avishur, “Pairs of Synonymous Words in the Construct State (and in Appositional Hendiadys) in Biblical Hebrew,” Semitics 2 (1971): 17-81.

3 tn The cohortative with vav (ו) conjunctive probably indicates purpose (“so that”) or intention.

4 tn Heb “As we have heard, so we have seen.” The community had heard about God’s mighty deeds in the nation’s history. Having personally witnessed his saving power with their own eyes, they could now affirm that the tradition was not exaggerated or inaccurate.

5 tn Heb “the Lord of hosts.” The title “Lord of hosts” here pictures the Lord as a mighty warrior-king who leads armies into battle (see Pss 24:10; 46:7, 11).

6 tn Or “God makes it secure forever.” The imperfect highlights the characteristic nature of the generalizing statement.

7 tn Heb “for this is God, our God, forever and ever.” “This” might be paraphrased, “this protector described and praised in the preceding verses.”

8 tn The imperfect highlights the characteristic nature of the generalizing statement.

9 tn In the Hebrew text the psalm ends with the words עַל־מוּת (’al-mut, “upon [unto?] dying”), which make little, if any, sense. M. Dahood (Psalms [AB], 1:293) proposes an otherwise unattested plural form עֹלָמוֹת (’olamot; from עוֹלָם, ’olam, “eternity”). This would provide a nice parallel to עוֹלָם וָעֶד (’olam vaed, “forever”) in the preceding line, but elsewhere the plural of עוֹלָם appears as עֹלָמִים (’olamim). It is preferable to understand the phrase as a musical direction of some sort (see עַל־מוּת [’al-mut] in the superscription of Ps 9) or to emend the text to עַל־עֲלָמוֹת (’al-alamot, “according to the alamoth style”; see the heading of Ps 46). In either case it should be understood as belonging with the superscription of the following psalm.

10 tn The words “he says” are supplied in the translation for clarification. God’s charges against his people follow.

11 tn Heb “Israel, and I will testify against you.” The imperative “listen” is understood in the second line by ellipsis (note the preceding line).

12 tn Heb “from bloodshed.” “Bloodshed” here stands by metonymy for the guilt which it produces.

13 tn Heb “my tongue will shout for joy your deliverance.” Another option is to take the prefixed verbal form as a jussive, “may my tongue shout for joy.” However, the pattern in vv. 12-15 appears to be prayer/request (see vv. 12, 14a, 15a) followed by promise/vow (see vv. 13, 14b, 15b).

14 tn The prefixed verb forms in vv. 6b-7a are understood as jussives.

15 tn Heb “will fear him.” After the jussive of the preceding line, the prefixed verbal form with prefixed vav (ו) conjunctive is understood as indicating purpose/result. (Note how v. 3 anticipates the universal impact of God showing his people blessing.) Another option is to take the verb as a jussive and translate, “Let all the ends of the earth fear him.”



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