NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Psalms 2:6-9

Context

2:6 “I myself 1  have installed 2  my king

on Zion, my holy hill.”

2:7 The king says, 3  “I will announce the Lord’s decree. He said to me: 4 

‘You are my son! 5  This very day I have become your father!

2:8 Ask me,

and I will give you the nations as your inheritance, 6 

the ends of the earth as your personal property.

2:9 You will break them 7  with an iron scepter; 8 

you will smash them like a potter’s jar!’” 9 

1 tn The first person pronoun appears before the first person verbal form for emphasis, reflected in the translation by “myself.”

2 tn Or perhaps “consecrated.”

3 tn The words “the king says” are supplied in the translation for clarification. The speaker is the Lord’s chosen king.

4 tn Or “I will relate the decree. The Lord said to me” (in accordance with the Masoretic accentuation).

5 sn ‘You are my son!’ The Davidic king was viewed as God’s “son” (see 2 Sam 7:14; Ps 89:26-27). The idiom reflects ancient Near Eastern adoption language associated with covenants of grant, by which a lord would reward a faithful subject by elevating him to special status, referred to as “sonship.” Like a son, the faithful subject received an “inheritance,” viewed as an unconditional, eternal gift. Such gifts usually took the form of land and/or an enduring dynasty. See M. Weinfeld, “The Covenant of Grant in the Old Testament and in the Ancient Near East,” JAOS 90 (1970): 184-203, for general discussion and some striking extra-biblical parallels.

6 sn I will give you the nations. The Lord promises the Davidic king universal dominion.

7 tc The LXX reads “you will shepherd them.” This reading, quoted in the Greek text of the NT in Rev 2:27; 12:5; 19:15, assumes a different vocalization of the consonantal Hebrew text and understands the verb as רָעָה (raah, “to shepherd”) rather than רָעָע (raa’, “to break”). But the presence of נָפַץ (nafats, “to smash”) in the next line strongly favors the MT vocalization.

8 tn The Hebrew term שֵׁבֶט (shevet) can refer to a “staff” or “rod,” but here it probably refers to the Davidic king’s royal scepter, symbolizing his sovereignty.

9 sn Like a potters jar. Before the Davidic king’s awesome power, the rebellious nations are like fragile pottery.



TIP #26: To open links on Discovery Box in a new window, use the right click. [ALL]
created in 0.03 seconds
powered by bible.org