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Psalms 2:2

Context

2:2 The kings of the earth 1  form a united front; 2 

the rulers collaborate 3 

against the Lord and his anointed king. 4 

Psalms 18:50

Context

18:50 He 5  gives his chosen king magnificent victories; 6 

he is faithful 7  to his chosen ruler, 8 

to David and his descendants 9  forever.” 10 

Psalms 20:6

Context

20:6 Now I am sure 11  that the Lord will deliver 12  his chosen king; 13 

he will intervene for him 14  from his holy heavenly temple, 15 

and display his mighty ability to deliver. 16 

Psalms 28:8

Context

28:8 The Lord strengthens his people; 17 

he protects and delivers his chosen king. 18 

Psalms 89:38

Context

89:38 But you have spurned 19  and rejected him;

you are angry with your chosen king. 20 

Psalms 89:51

Context

89:51 Your enemies, O Lord, hurl insults;

they insult your chosen king as they dog his footsteps. 21 

Psalms 132:10

Context

132:10 For the sake of David, your servant,

do not reject your chosen king! 22 

Psalms 132:17

Context

132:17 There I will make David strong; 23 

I have determined that my chosen king’s dynasty will continue. 24 

1 sn The expression kings of the earth refers somewhat hyperbolically to the kings who had been conquered by and were subject to the Davidic king.

2 tn Or “take their stand.” The Hebrew imperfect verbal form describes their action as underway.

3 tn Or “conspire together.” The verbal form is a Niphal from יָסַד (yasad). BDB 413-14 s.v. יָסַד defines the verb as “establish, found,” but HALOT 417 s.v. II יסד proposes a homonym meaning “get together, conspire” (an alternate form of סוּד, sud).

4 tn Heb “and against his anointed one.” The Davidic king is the referent (see vv. 6-7).

5 tn Or “the one who.”

6 tn Heb “magnifies the victories of his king.” “His king” refers to the psalmist, the Davidic king whom God has chosen to rule Israel.

7 tn Heb “[the one who] does loyalty.”

8 tn Heb “his anointed [one],” i.e., the psalmist/Davidic king. See Ps 2:2.

9 tn Or “offspring”; Heb “seed.”

10 sn If David is the author of the psalm (see the superscription), then he here anticipates that God will continue to demonstrate loyalty to his descendants who succeed him. If the author is a later Davidic king, then he views the divine favor he has experienced as the outworking of God’s faithful promises to David his ancestor.

11 tn Or “know.”

sn Now I am sure. The speaker is not identified. It is likely that the king, referring to himself in the third person (note “his chosen king”), responds to the people’s prayer. Perhaps his confidence is due to the reception of a divine oracle of salvation.

12 tn The perfect verbal form is probably used rhetorically to state that the deliverance is as good as done. In this way the speaker emphasizes the certainty of the deliverance. Another option is to take the statement as generalizing; the psalmist affirms that the Lord typically delivers the king.

13 tn Heb “his anointed one.” This title refers to the Davidic king. See Pss 2:2 and 18:50.

14 tn Heb “he will answer him.”

15 tn Heb “from his holy heavens.”

16 tn Heb “with mighty acts of deliverance of his right hand.” The Lord’s “right hand” here symbolizes his power to protect and deliver (see Ps 17:7).

17 tn Heb “the Lord [is] strength to them” (or perhaps, “to him”). The form לָמוֹ (lamo, “to them/him”) is probably a corruption of an original לְעַמוֹ (lÿamo, “to his people”; see P. C. Craigie, Psalms 1-50 [WBC], 236), perhaps due to quiescence of the letter ayin (ע; see P. McCarter, Textual Criticism [GBS], 55). Note the reference to the Lord’s “people” in the next verse.

18 tn Heb “he [is] a refuge of help for his anointed one.” The noun מָשִׁיחַ (mashiakh, “anointed one”) refers to the Davidic king, who perhaps speaks as representative of the nation in this psalm. See Pss 2:2; 18:50; 20:6; 84:9; 89:38, 51; 132:10, 17.

19 tn The Hebrew construction (conjunction + pronoun, followed by the verb) draws attention to the contrast between what follows and what precedes.

20 tn Heb “your anointed one.” The Hebrew phrase מְשִׁיחֶךָ (mÿshikhekha, “your anointed one”) refers here to the Davidic king (see Pss 2:2; 18:50; 20:6; 28:8; 84:9; 132:10, 17).

21 tn Heb “[by] which your enemies, O Lord, taunt, [by] which they taunt [at] the heels of your anointed one.”

22 tn Heb “do not turn away the face of your anointed one.”

23 tn Heb “there I will cause a horn to sprout for David.” The horn of an ox underlies the metaphor (cf. Deut 33:17; 1 Kgs 22:11; Pss 18:2; 92:10). The horn of the wild ox is frequently a metaphor for military strength; the idiom “exalt the horn” signifies military victory (see 1 Sam 2:10; Pss 89:17, 24; 92:10; Lam 2:17). In the ancient Near East powerful warrior-kings would sometimes compare themselves to a goring bull that used its horns to kill its enemies. For examples, see P. Miller, “El the Warrior,” HTR 60 (1967): 422-25, and R. B. Chisholm, “An Exegetical and Theological Study of Psalm 18/2 Samuel 22” (Th.D. diss., Dallas Theological Seminary, 1983), 135-36.

24 tn Heb “I have arranged a lamp for my anointed one.” Here the “lamp” is a metaphor for the Davidic dynasty (see 1 Kgs 11:36).



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