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Psalms 27:1

Context
Psalm 27 1 

By David.

27:1 The Lord delivers and vindicates me! 2 

I fear no one! 3 

The Lord protects my life!

I am afraid of no one! 4 

Psalms 28:8

Context

28:8 The Lord strengthens his people; 5 

he protects and delivers his chosen king. 6 

Psalms 31:3

Context

31:3 For you are my high ridge 7  and my stronghold;

for the sake of your own reputation 8  you lead me and guide me. 9 

Psalms 31:5

Context

31:5 Into your hand I entrust my life; 10 

you will rescue 11  me, O Lord, the faithful God.

Psalms 37:39

Context

37:39 But the Lord delivers the godly; 12 

he protects them in times of trouble. 13 

Psalms 43:2

Context

43:2 For you are the God who shelters me. 14 

Why do you reject me? 15 

Why must I walk around 16  mourning 17 

because my enemies oppress me?

Psalms 52:9

Context

52:9 I will continually 18  thank you when 19  you execute judgment; 20 

I will rely 21  on you, 22  for your loyal followers know you are good. 23 

1 sn Psalm 27. The author is confident of the Lord’s protection and asks the Lord to vindicate him.

2 tn Heb “the Lord [is] my light and my deliverance.” “Light” is often used as a metaphor for deliverance and the life/blessings it brings. See Pss 37:6; 97:11; 112:4; Isa 49:6; 51:4; Mic 7:8. Another option is that “light” refers here to divine guidance (see Ps 43:3).

3 tn Heb “Whom shall I fear?” The rhetorical question anticipates the answer, “No one!”

4 tn Heb “Of whom shall I be afraid?” The rhetorical question anticipates the answer, “No one!”

5 tn Heb “the Lord [is] strength to them” (or perhaps, “to him”). The form לָמוֹ (lamo, “to them/him”) is probably a corruption of an original לְעַמוֹ (lÿamo, “to his people”; see P. C. Craigie, Psalms 1-50 [WBC], 236), perhaps due to quiescence of the letter ayin (ע; see P. McCarter, Textual Criticism [GBS], 55). Note the reference to the Lord’s “people” in the next verse.

6 tn Heb “he [is] a refuge of help for his anointed one.” The noun מָשִׁיחַ (mashiakh, “anointed one”) refers to the Davidic king, who perhaps speaks as representative of the nation in this psalm. See Pss 2:2; 18:50; 20:6; 84:9; 89:38, 51; 132:10, 17.

7 sn The metaphor of the high ridge pictures God as a rocky, relatively inaccessible summit, where one would be able to find protection from enemies. See 1 Sam 23:25, 28.

8 tn Heb “name.” The Hebrew term שֵׁם (shem, “name”) refers here to the Lord’s reputation. (The English term “name” is often used the same way.)

9 tn The present translation assumes that the imperfect verbal forms are generalizing, “you lead me and guide me.” Other options are to take them as an expression of confidence about the future, “you will lead me and guide me” (cf. NASB), or as expressing a prayer, “lead me and guide me” (cf. NEB, NIV, NRSV).

10 tn Heb “my spirit.” The noun רוּחַ (ruakh, “spirit”) here refers to the animating spirit that gives the psalmist life.

11 tn Or “redeem.” The perfect verbal form is understood here as anticipatory, indicating rhetorically the psalmist’s certitude and confidence that God will intervene. The psalmist is so confident of God’s positive response to his prayer that he can describe his deliverance as if it had already happened. Another option is to take the perfect as precative, expressing a wish or request (“rescue me”; cf. NIV). See IBHS 494-95 §30.5.4c, d. However, not all grammarians are convinced that the perfect is used as a precative in biblical Hebrew.

12 tn Heb “and the deliverance of the godly [ones] [is] from the Lord.”

13 tn Heb “[he is] their place of refuge in a time of trouble.”

14 tn Heb “God of my place of refuge,” that is, “God who is my place of refuge.” See Ps 31:4.

15 tn The question is similar to that of Ps 42:9, but זָנַח (zanakh, “reject”) is a stronger verb than שָׁכַח (shakhakh, “forget”).

16 tn The language is similar to that of Ps 42:9, but the Hitpael form of the verb הָלַךְ (halakh; as opposed to the Qal form in 42:9) expresses more forcefully the continuing nature of the psalmist’s distress.

17 sn Walk around mourning. See Ps 38:6 for a similar statement.

18 tn Or, hyperbolically, “forever.”

19 tn Or “for.”

20 tn Heb “you have acted.” The perfect verbal form (1) probably indicates a future perfect here. The psalmist promises to give thanks when the expected vindication has been accomplished. Other options include (2) a generalizing (“for you act”) or (3) rhetorical (“for you will act”) use.

21 tn Or “wait.”

22 tn Heb “your name.” God’s “name” refers here to his reputation and revealed character.

23 tn Heb “for it is good in front of your loyal followers.”



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