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Psalms 17:7

Context

17:7 Accomplish awesome, faithful deeds, 1 

you who powerfully deliver those who look to you for protection from their enemies. 2 

Psalms 20:6

Context

20:6 Now I am sure 3  that the Lord will deliver 4  his chosen king; 5 

he will intervene for him 6  from his holy heavenly temple, 7 

and display his mighty ability to deliver. 8 

Psalms 21:8

Context

21:8 You 9  prevail over 10  all your enemies;

your power is too great for those who hate you. 11 

1 tn Heb “Set apart faithful acts.”

2 tn Heb “[O] one who delivers those who seek shelter from the ones raising themselves up, by your right hand.” The Lord’s “right hand” here symbolizes his power to protect and deliver.

sn Those who look to you for protection from their enemies. “Seeking shelter” in the Lord is an idiom for seeking his protection. Seeking his protection presupposes and even demonstrates the subject’s loyalty to the Lord. In the psalms those who “take shelter” in the Lord are contrasted with the wicked and equated with those who love, fear and serve the Lord (Pss 5:11-12; 31:17-20; 34:21-22).

3 tn Or “know.”

sn Now I am sure. The speaker is not identified. It is likely that the king, referring to himself in the third person (note “his chosen king”), responds to the people’s prayer. Perhaps his confidence is due to the reception of a divine oracle of salvation.

4 tn The perfect verbal form is probably used rhetorically to state that the deliverance is as good as done. In this way the speaker emphasizes the certainty of the deliverance. Another option is to take the statement as generalizing; the psalmist affirms that the Lord typically delivers the king.

5 tn Heb “his anointed one.” This title refers to the Davidic king. See Pss 2:2 and 18:50.

6 tn Heb “he will answer him.”

7 tn Heb “from his holy heavens.”

8 tn Heb “with mighty acts of deliverance of his right hand.” The Lord’s “right hand” here symbolizes his power to protect and deliver (see Ps 17:7).

9 tn The king is now addressed. One could argue that the Lord is still being addressed, but v. 9 militates against this proposal, for there the Lord is mentioned in the third person and appears to be distinct from the addressee (unless, of course, one takes “Lord” in v. 9 as vocative; see the note on “them” in v. 9b). Verse 7 begins this transition to a new addressee by referring to both the king and the Lord in the third person (in vv. 1-6 the Lord is addressed and only the king referred to in the third person).

10 tn Heb “your hand finds.” The idiom pictures the king grabbing hold of his enemies and defeating them (see 1 Sam 23:17). The imperfect verbal forms in vv. 8-12 may be translated with the future tense, as long as the future is understood as generalizing.

11 tn Heb “your right hand finds those who hate you.”



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