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Luke 5:21

Context
5:21 Then 1  the experts in the law 2  and the Pharisees began to think 3  to themselves, 4  “Who is this man 5  who is uttering blasphemies? 6  Who can forgive sins but God alone?”

Luke 7:39

Context
7:39 Now when the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, 7  he said to himself, “If this man were a prophet, 8  he would know who and what kind of woman 9  this is who is touching him, that she is a sinner.”

Luke 13:32

Context
13:32 But 10  he said to them, “Go 11  and tell that fox, 12  ‘Look, I am casting out demons and performing healings today and tomorrow, and on the third day 13  I will complete my work. 14 

Luke 23:4

Context
23:4 Then 15  Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowds, “I find no basis for an accusation 16  against this man.”

Luke 23:14

Context
23:14 and said to them, “You brought me this man as one who was misleading 17  the people. When I examined him before you, I 18  did not find this man guilty 19  of anything you accused him of doing.

Luke 23:22

Context
23:22 A third time he said to them, “Why? What wrong has he done? I have found him guilty 20  of no crime deserving death. 21  I will therefore flog 22  him and release him.”

Luke 23:35

Context
23:35 The people also stood there watching, but the rulers ridiculed 23  him, saying, “He saved others. Let him save 24  himself if 25  he is the Christ 26  of God, his chosen one!”

1 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

2 tn Or “Then the scribes.” The traditional rendering of γραμματεύς (grammateu") as “scribe” does not communicate much to the modern English reader, for whom the term might mean “professional copyist,” if it means anything at all. The people referred to here were recognized experts in the law of Moses and in traditional laws and regulations. Thus “expert in the law” comes closer to the meaning for the modern reader.

3 tn Or “to reason” (in a hostile sense). See G. Schrenk, TDNT 2:97.

4 tn The participle λέγοντες (legontes, “saying”) has not been translated because it is redundant in contemporary English.

5 tn Grk “this one” (οὗτος, Joutos).

6 sn Uttering blasphemies meant to say something that dishonored God. To claim divine prerogatives or claim to speak for God when one really does not would be such an act of offense. The remark raised directly the issue of the nature of Jesus’ ministry.

7 tn The word “this” is not in the Greek text, but is implied. Direct objects were frequently omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

8 tn This is a good example of a second class (contrary to fact) Greek conditional sentence. The Pharisee said, in effect, “If this man were a prophet (but he is not)…”

9 sn The Pharisees believed in a form of separationism that would have prevented them from any kind of association with such a sinful woman.

10 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “but” to indicate the contrast present in this context.

11 tn The participle πορευθέντες (poreuqente") has been taken as indicating attendant circumstance.

12 sn That fox. This is not fundamentally a figure for cleverness as in modern western culture, but could indicate (1) an insignificant person (Neh 4:3; 2 Esd 13:35 LXX); (2) a deceiver (Song Rabbah 2.15.1 on 2:15); or someone destructive, a destroyer (Ezek 13:4; Lam 5:18; 1 En. 89:10, 42-49, 55). Luke’s emphasis seems to be on destructiveness, since Herod killed John the Baptist, whom Luke calls “the greatest born of women” (Luke 7:28) and later stands opposed to Jesus (Acts 4:26-28). In addition, “a person who is designated a fox is an insignificant or base person. He lacks real power and dignity, using cunning deceit to achieve his aims” (H. W. Hoehner, Herod Antipas [SNTSMS], 347).

13 sn The third day is a figurative reference to being further on in time, not a reference to three days from now. Jesus is not even in Jerusalem yet, and the events of the last days in Jerusalem take a good week.

14 tn Or “I reach my goal.” The verb τελειόω (teleiow) is a key NT term for the completion of God’s plan: See Luke 12:50; 22:37; John 19:30; and (where it has the additional component of meaning “to perfect”) Heb 2:10; 5:8-9; 7:28.

15 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

16 tn Grk “find no cause.”

sn Pilate’s statement “I find no reason for an accusation” is the first of several remarks in Luke 23 that Jesus is innocent or of efforts to release him (vv. 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 22).

17 tn This term also appears in v. 2.

18 tn Grk “behold, I” A transitional use of ἰδού (idou) has not been translated here.

19 tn Grk “nothing did I find in this man by way of cause.” The reference to “nothing” is emphatic.

20 tn Grk “no cause of death I found in him.”

21 sn The refrain of innocence comes once again. Pilate tried to bring some sense of justice, believing Jesus had committed no crime deserving death.

22 tn Or “scourge” (BDAG 749 s.v. παιδεύω 2.b.γ). See the note on “flogged” in v. 16.

23 tn A figurative extension of the literal meaning “to turn one’s nose up at someone”; here “ridicule, sneer at, show contempt for” (L&N 33.409).

24 sn The irony in the statement Let him save himself is that salvation did come, but later, not while on the cross.

25 tn This is a first class condition in the Greek text.

26 tn Or “Messiah”; both “Christ” (Greek) and “Messiah” (Hebrew and Aramaic) mean “one who has been anointed.”

sn See the note on Christ in 2:11.



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