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Luke 4:36

Context
4:36 They 1  were all amazed and began to say 2  to one another, “What’s happening here? 3  For with authority and power 4  he commands the unclean spirits, and they come out!”

Luke 5:9

Context
5:9 For 5  Peter 6  and all who were with him were astonished 7  at the catch of fish that they had taken,

Luke 5:26

Context
5:26 Then 8  astonishment 9  seized them all, and they glorified 10  God. They were filled with awe, 11  saying, “We have seen incredible 12  things 13  today.” 14 

Luke 7:16

Context
7:16 Fear 15  seized them all, and they began to glorify 16  God, saying, “A great prophet 17  has appeared 18  among us!” and “God has come to help 19  his people!”

1 tn Grk “And they.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

2 tn This imperfect verb has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

3 tn Grk “What is this word?” The Greek term λόγος (logos) has a wide range of meaning. Here it seems to mean, “What is this matter?” More idiomatically it would be, “What’s going on here?!”

4 sn The phrase with authority and power is in an emphatic position in the Greek text. Once again the authority of Jesus is the point, but now it is not just his teaching that is emphasized, but his ministry. Jesus combined word and deed into a powerful testimony in Capernaum.

5 sn An explanatory conjunction (For) makes it clear that Peter’s exclamation is the result of a surprising set of events. He speaks, but the others feel similarly.

6 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Peter) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

7 sn In the Greek text, this term is in an emphatic position.

8 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

9 tn Or “amazement.” See L&N 25.217, which translates this clause, “astonishment seized all of them.”

10 tn This imperfect verb could be translated as an ingressive (“they began to glorify God”), but this is somewhat awkward in English since the following verb is aorist and is normally translated as a simple past.

11 tn Grk “fear,” but the context and the following remark show that it is mixed with wonder; see L&N 53.59.

12 tn Or “remarkable.” The term παράδοξος (paradoxos) is hard to translate exactly; it suggests both the unusual and the awe inspiring in this context. For the alternatives see L&N 31.44 (“incredible”) and 58.56 (“remarkable”). It is often something beyond belief (G. Kittel, TDNT 2:255).

13 tn The word “things” is not in the Greek text, but has been supplied because the adjective παράδοξος (paradoxos) is substantival. Other translations sometimes supply alternate words like “miracles” or “signs,” but “things” is the most neutral translation.

14 sn See the note on today in 2:11.

15 tn Or “Awe.” Grk “fear,” but the context and the following remark show that it is mixed with wonder; see L&N 53.59. This is a reaction to God’s work; see Luke 5:9.

16 tn This imperfect verb has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

17 sn That Jesus was a great prophet was a natural conclusion for the crowd to make, given the healing; but Jesus is more than this. See Luke 9:8, 19-20.

18 tn Grk “arisen.”

19 tn Grk “visited,” but this conveys a different impression to a modern reader. L&N 85.11 renders the verb, “to be present, with the implication of concern – ‘to be present to help, to be on hand to aid.’ … ‘God has come to help his people’ Lk 7:16.” The language recalls Luke 1:68, 78.



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