NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Luke 2:20

Context
2:20 So 1  the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising 2  God for all they had heard and seen; everything was just as they had been told. 3 

Luke 4:15

Context
4:15 He 4  began to teach 5  in their synagogues 6  and was praised 7  by all.

Luke 5:26

Context
5:26 Then 8  astonishment 9  seized them all, and they glorified 10  God. They were filled with awe, 11  saying, “We have seen incredible 12  things 13  today.” 14 

Luke 7:16

Context
7:16 Fear 15  seized them all, and they began to glorify 16  God, saying, “A great prophet 17  has appeared 18  among us!” and “God has come to help 19  his people!”

Luke 13:13

Context
13:13 Then 20  he placed his hands on her, and immediately 21  she straightened up and praised God.

Luke 17:15

Context
17:15 Then one of them, when he saw he was healed, turned back, praising 22  God with a loud voice.

Luke 18:43

Context
18:43 And immediately he regained 23  his sight and followed Jesus, 24  praising 25  God. When 26  all the people saw it, they too 27  gave praise to God.

Luke 23:47

Context

23:47 Now when the centurion 28  saw what had happened, he praised God and said, “Certainly this man was innocent!” 29 

1 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the conclusion of the topic.

2 sn The mention of glorifying and praising God is the second note of praise in this section; see Luke 2:13-14.

3 tn Grk “just as [it] had been spoken to them.” This has been simplified in the English translation by making the prepositional phrase (“to them”) the subject of the passive verb.

sn The closing remark just as they had been told notes a major theme of Luke 1-2 as he sought to reassure Theophilus: God does what he says he will do.

4 tn Grk “And he.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

5 tn The imperfect verb has been translated ingressively.

6 sn The next incident in Luke 4:16-30 is probably to be seen as an example of this ministry of teaching in their synagogues in Galilee. Synagogues were places for Jewish prayer and worship, with recognized leadership (cf. Luke 8:41). Though the origin of the synagogue is not entirely clear, it seems to have arisen in the postexilic community during the intertestamental period. A town could establish a synagogue if there were at least ten men. In normative Judaism of the NT period, the OT scripture was read and discussed in the synagogue by the men who were present (see the Mishnah, m. Megillah 3-4; m. Berakhot 2).

7 tn Grk “being glorified.” The participle δοξαζόμενος (doxazomeno") has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style. This is the only place Luke uses the verb δοξάζω (doxazw) of Jesus.

8 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

9 tn Or “amazement.” See L&N 25.217, which translates this clause, “astonishment seized all of them.”

10 tn This imperfect verb could be translated as an ingressive (“they began to glorify God”), but this is somewhat awkward in English since the following verb is aorist and is normally translated as a simple past.

11 tn Grk “fear,” but the context and the following remark show that it is mixed with wonder; see L&N 53.59.

12 tn Or “remarkable.” The term παράδοξος (paradoxos) is hard to translate exactly; it suggests both the unusual and the awe inspiring in this context. For the alternatives see L&N 31.44 (“incredible”) and 58.56 (“remarkable”). It is often something beyond belief (G. Kittel, TDNT 2:255).

13 tn The word “things” is not in the Greek text, but has been supplied because the adjective παράδοξος (paradoxos) is substantival. Other translations sometimes supply alternate words like “miracles” or “signs,” but “things” is the most neutral translation.

14 sn See the note on today in 2:11.

15 tn Or “Awe.” Grk “fear,” but the context and the following remark show that it is mixed with wonder; see L&N 53.59. This is a reaction to God’s work; see Luke 5:9.

16 tn This imperfect verb has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

17 sn That Jesus was a great prophet was a natural conclusion for the crowd to make, given the healing; but Jesus is more than this. See Luke 9:8, 19-20.

18 tn Grk “arisen.”

19 tn Grk “visited,” but this conveys a different impression to a modern reader. L&N 85.11 renders the verb, “to be present, with the implication of concern – ‘to be present to help, to be on hand to aid.’ … ‘God has come to help his people’ Lk 7:16.” The language recalls Luke 1:68, 78.

20 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

21 sn The healing took place immediately.

22 tn Grk “glorifying God.”

23 tn Or “received” (see the note on the phrase “let me see again” in v. 41).

24 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

25 sn The presence of God’s work leads again to joy, with both the beggar and the people praising God (1:64; 2:20; 5:25-26; 7:16; 13:13; 17:15; 19:37).

26 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

27 tn The word “too” has been supplied for stylistic reasons.

28 sn See the note on the word centurion in 7:2.

29 tn Or “righteous.” It is hard to know whether “innocent” or “righteous” is intended, as the Greek term used can mean either, and both make good sense in this context. Luke has been emphasizing Jesus as innocent, so that is slightly more likely here. Of course, one idea entails the other.

sn Here is a fourth figure who said that Jesus was innocent in this chapter (Pilate, Herod, a criminal, and now a centurion).



TIP #17: Navigate the Study Dictionary using word-wheel index or search box. [ALL]
created in 0.04 seconds
powered by bible.org