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Luke 2:16

Context
2:16 So they hurried off and located Mary and Joseph, and found the baby lying in a manger. 1 

Luke 2:26-32

Context
2:26 It 2  had been revealed 3  to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not die 4  before 5  he had seen the Lord’s Christ. 6  2:27 So 7  Simeon, 8  directed by the Spirit, 9  came into the temple courts, 10  and when the parents brought in the child Jesus to do for him what was customary according to the law, 11  2:28 Simeon 12  took him in his arms and blessed God, saying, 13 

2:29 “Now, according to your word, 14  Sovereign Lord, 15  permit 16  your servant 17  to depart 18  in peace.

2:30 For my eyes have seen your salvation 19 

2:31 that you have prepared in the presence of all peoples: 20 

2:32 a light, 21 

for revelation to the Gentiles,

and for glory 22  to your people Israel.”

Luke 2:38

Context
2:38 At that moment, 23  she came up to them 24  and began to give thanks to God and to speak 25  about the child 26  to all who were waiting for the redemption of Jerusalem. 27 

1 tn Or “a feeding trough.”

2 tn Grk “And it.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

3 tn The use of the passive suggests a revelation by God, and in the OT the corresponding Hebrew term represented here by κεχρηματισμένον (kecrhmatismenon) indicated some form of direct revelation from God (Jer 25:30; 33:2; Job 40:8).

4 tn Grk “would not see death” (an idiom for dying).

5 tn On the grammar of this temporal clause, see BDF §§383.3; 395.

6 tn Or “Messiah”; both “Christ” (Greek) and “Messiah” (Hebrew and Aramaic) mean “one who has been anointed.”

sn The revelation to Simeon that he would not die before he had seen the Lords Christ is yet another example of a promise fulfilled in Luke 1-2. Also, see the note on Christ in 2:11.

7 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the consequential nature of the action.

8 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Simeon) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

9 tn Grk “So in the Spirit” or “So by the Spirit,” but since it refers to the Spirit’s direction the expanded translation “directed by the Spirit” is used here.

10 tn Grk “the temple.”

sn The temple courts is a reference to the larger temple area, not the holy place. Simeon was either in the court of the Gentiles or the court of women, since Mary was present.

11 tn Grk “to do for him according to the custom of the law.” See Luke 2:22-24.

12 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Simeon) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

13 tn Grk “and said.” The finite verb in Greek has been replaced with a participle in English to improve the smoothness of the translation.

14 sn The phrase according to your word again emphasizes that God will perform his promise.

15 tn The Greek word translated here by “Sovereign Lord” is δεσπότης (despoth").

16 sn This short prophetic declaration is sometimes called the Nunc dimittis, which comes from the opening phrase of the saying in Latin, “now dismiss,” a fairly literal translation of the Greek verb ἀπολύεις (apolueis, “now release”) in this verse.

17 tn Here the Greek word δοῦλος (doulos, “slave”) has been translated “servant” since it acts almost as an honorific term for one specially chosen and appointed to carry out the Lord’s tasks.

sn Undoubtedly the background for the concept of being the Lord’s slave or servant is to be found in the Old Testament scriptures. For a Jew this concept did not connote drudgery, but honor and privilege. It was used of national Israel at times (Isa 43:10), but was especially associated with famous OT personalities, including such great men as Moses (Josh 14:7), David (Ps 89:3; cf. 2 Sam 7:5, 8) and Elijah (2 Kgs 10:10); all these men were “servants (or slaves) of the Lord.”

18 tn Grk “now release your servant.”

19 sn To see Jesus, the Messiah, is to see God’s salvation.

20 sn Is the phrase all peoples a reference to Israel alone, or to both Israel and the Gentiles? The following verse makes it clear that all peoples includes Gentiles, another key Lukan emphasis (Luke 24:47; Acts 10:34-43).

21 tn The syntax of this verse is disputed. Most read “light” and “glory” in parallelism, so Jesus is a light for revelation to the Gentiles and is glory to the people for Israel. Others see “light” (1:78-79) as a summary, while “revelation” and “glory” are parallel, so Jesus is light for all, but is revelation for the Gentiles and glory for Israel. Both readings make good sense and either could be correct, but Luke 1:78-79 and Acts 26:22-23 slightly favor this second option.

22 sn In other words, Jesus is a special cause for praise and honor (“glory”) for the nation.

23 tn Grk “at that very hour.”

24 tn Grk “And coming up.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style. The participle ἐπιστᾶσα (epistasa) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

25 tn The imperfect ἐλάλει (elalei) here looks at a process of declaration, not a single moment. She clearly was led by God to address men and women about the hope Jesus was. The testimony of Luke 1—2 to Jesus has involved all types of people.

26 tn Grk “him”; the referent (the child) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

27 tc A few mss (1216 pc) read ᾿Ισραήλ (Israhl, “Israel”) or ἐν τῷ ᾿Ισραήλ (en tw Israhl, “in Israel”), but this reading does not have enough ms support to be considered authentic. More substantial is the reading ἐν ᾿Ιερουσαλήμ (en Ierousalhm, “in Jerusalem”; found in A D L Θ Ψ 0130 Ë13 33 Ï), though the preposition was almost surely added to clarify (and perhaps alter) the meaning of the original. The simple ᾿Ιερουσαλήμ, without preposition, is found in א B W Ξ 1 565* lat co.

map For location see Map5 B1; Map6 F3; Map7 E2; Map8 F2; Map10 B3; JP1 F4; JP2 F4; JP3 F4; JP4 F4.



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