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Luke 23:8-12

Context
23:8 When 1  Herod saw Jesus, he was very glad, for he had long desired to see him, because he had heard about him and was hoping to see him perform 2  some miraculous sign. 3  23:9 So 4  Herod 5  questioned him at considerable length; Jesus 6  gave him no answer. 23:10 The chief priests and the experts in the law 7  were there, vehemently accusing him. 8  23:11 Even Herod with his soldiers treated him with contempt and mocked him. Then, 9  dressing him in elegant clothes, 10  Herod 11  sent him back to Pilate. 23:12 That very day Herod and Pilate became friends with each other, 12  for prior to this they had been enemies. 13 

Luke 23:15

Context
23:15 Neither did Herod, for he sent him back to us. Look, he has done nothing 14  deserving death. 15 

1 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

2 tn Grk “to see some sign performed by him.” Here the passive construction has been translated as an active one in keeping with contemporary English style.

3 sn Herod, hoping to see him perform some miraculous sign, seems to have treated Jesus as a curiosity (cf. 9:7-9).

4 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of the previous statements in the narrative about Herod’s desire to see Jesus.

5 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Herod) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

6 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

7 tn Or “and the scribes.” See the note on the phrase “experts in the law” in 5:21.

8 sn Luke portrays the Jewish leadership as driving events toward the cross by vehemently accusing Jesus.

9 tn This is a continuation of the previous Greek sentence, but because of its length and complexity, a new sentence was started here in the translation by supplying “then” to indicate the sequence of events.

10 sn This mockery involved putting elegant royal clothes on Jesus, either white or purple (the colors of royalty). This was no doubt a mockery of Jesus’ claim to be a king.

11 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Herod) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

12 sn Herod and Pilate became friends with each other. It may be that Pilate’s change of heart was related to the death of his superior, Sejanus, who had a reputation for being anti-Jewish. To please his superior, Pilate may have ruled the Jews with insensitivity. Concerning Sejanus, see Philo, Embassy 24 (160-61) and Flaccus 1 (1).

13 tn Grk “at enmity with each other.”

14 sn With the statement “he has done nothing,” Pilate makes another claim that Jesus is innocent of any crime worthy of death.

15 tn Grk “nothing deserving death has been done by him.” The passive construction has been translated as an active one in keeping with contemporary English style.



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