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Luke 1:77-79

Context

1:77 to give his people knowledge of salvation 1  through the forgiveness 2  of their sins.

1:78 Because of 3  our God’s tender mercy 4 

the dawn 5  will break 6  upon us from on high

1:79 to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, 7 

to guide our feet into the way 8  of peace.”

Luke 18:35-43

Context
Healing a Blind Man

18:35 As 9  Jesus 10  approached 11  Jericho, 12  a blind man was sitting by the road begging. 18:36 When he heard a crowd going by, he asked what was going on. 18:37 They 13  told him, “Jesus the Nazarene is passing by.” 18:38 So 14  he called out, 15  “Jesus, Son of David, 16  have mercy 17  on me!” 18:39 And those who were in front 18  scolded 19  him to get him to be quiet, but he shouted 20  even more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 18:40 So 21  Jesus stopped and ordered the beggar 22  to be brought to him. When the man 23  came near, Jesus 24  asked him, 18:41 “What do you want me to do for you?” He replied, 25  “Lord, let me see again.” 26  18:42 Jesus 27  said to him, “Receive 28  your sight; your faith has healed you.” 29  18:43 And immediately he regained 30  his sight and followed Jesus, 31  praising 32  God. When 33  all the people saw it, they too 34  gave praise to God.

1 sn John’s role, to give his people knowledge of salvation, is similar to that of Jesus (Luke 3:1-14; 5:31-32).

2 sn Forgiveness is another major Lukan theme (Luke 4:18; 24:47; Acts 10:37).

3 tn For reasons of style, a new sentence has been started in the translation at this point. God’s mercy is ultimately seen in the deliverance John points to, so v. 78a is placed with the reference to Jesus as the light of dawning day.

4 sn God’s loyal love (steadfast love) is again the topic, reflected in the phrase tender mercy; see Luke 1:72.

5 sn The Greek term translated dawn (ἀνατολή, anatolh) can be a reference to the morning star or to the sun. The Messiah is pictured as a saving light that shows the way. The Greek term was also used to translate the Hebrew word for “branch” or “sprout,” so some see a double entendre here with messianic overtones (see Isa 11:1-10; Jer 23:5; 33:15; Zech 3:8; 6:12).

6 tn Grk “shall visit us.”

7 sn On the phrases who sit in darkness…and…death see Isa 9:1-2; 42:7; 49:9-10.

8 tn Or “the path.”

9 tn Grk “Now it happened that as.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

10 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been supplied in the translation for clarity.

11 tn The phrase is “he drew near to” (19:29; 24:28). It is also possible the term merely means “is in the vicinity of.” Also possible is a reversal in the timing of the healing and Zacchaeus events for literary reasons as the blind man “sees” where the rich man with everything did not.

12 map For location see Map5 B2; Map6 E1; Map7 E1; Map8 E3; Map10 A2; Map11 A1.

13 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated. “They” could refer to bystanders or people in the crowd.

14 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of the blind man learning that Jesus was nearby.

15 tn Grk “called out, saying.” The participle λέγων (legwn) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

16 sn Jesus was more than a Nazarene to this blind person, who saw quite well that Jesus was Son of David. He understood what Luke 7:22-23 affirms. There was a tradition in Judaism that the Son of David (Solomon) had great powers of healing (Josephus, Ant. 8.2.5 [8.42-49]).

17 sn Have mercy on me is a request for healing (cf. 17:13). It is not owed the man. He simply asks for God’s kind grace.

18 sn That is, those who were at the front of the procession.

19 tn Or “rebuked.” The crowd’s view was that surely Jesus would not be bothered with someone as unimportant as a blind beggar.

20 sn Public opinion would not sway the blind man from getting Jesus’ attention. The term shouted is strong as it can be used of animal cries.

21 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of the beggar’s cries.

22 tn Grk “ordered him”; the referent (the blind beggar, v. 35) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

23 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the beggar) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

24 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

25 tn Grk “said.”

26 tn Grk “Lord, that I may see [again].” The phrase can be rendered as an imperative of request, “Please, give me sight.” Since the man is not noted as having been blind from birth (as the man in John 9 was) it is likely the request is to receive back the sight he once had.

27 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

28 tn Or “Regain” (see the note on the phrase “let me see again” in the previous verse).

29 tn Grk “has saved you,” but in a nonsoteriological sense; the man has been delivered from his disability.

30 tn Or “received” (see the note on the phrase “let me see again” in v. 41).

31 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

32 sn The presence of God’s work leads again to joy, with both the beggar and the people praising God (1:64; 2:20; 5:25-26; 7:16; 13:13; 17:15; 19:37).

33 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

34 tn The word “too” has been supplied for stylistic reasons.



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