NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Luke 1:32

Context
1:32 He 1  will be great, 2  and will be called the Son of the Most High, 3  and the Lord God will give him the throne of his father 4  David.

Luke 7:22-23

Context
7:22 So 5  he answered them, 6  “Go tell 7  John what you have seen and heard: 8  The blind see, the lame walk, lepers are cleansed, the 9  deaf hear, the dead are raised, the poor have good news proclaimed to them. 7:23 Blessed is anyone 10  who takes no offense at me.”

Luke 7:28

Context
7:28 I tell you, among those born of women no one is greater 11  than John. 12  Yet the one who is least 13  in the kingdom of God 14  is greater than he is.”

1 tn Grk “this one.”

2 sn Compare the description of Jesus as great here with 1:15, “great before the Lord.” Jesus is greater than John, since he is Messiah compared to a prophet. Great is stated absolutely without qualification to make the point.

3 sn The expression Most High is a way to refer to God without naming him. Such avoiding of direct reference to God was common in 1st century Judaism out of reverence for the divine name.

4 tn Or “ancestor.”

5 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the relationship to Jesus’ miraculous cures in the preceding sentence.

6 tn Grk “answering, he said to them.” This is redundant in English and has been simplified in the translation to “he answered them.”

7 sn The same verb has been translated “inform” in 7:18.

8 sn What you have seen and heard. The following activities all paraphrase various OT descriptions of the time of promised salvation: Isa 35:5-6; 26:19; 29:18-19; 61:1. Jesus is answering not by acknowledging a title, but by pointing to the nature of his works, thus indicating the nature of the time.

9 tn Grk “and the,” but καί (kai) has not been translated since English normally uses a coordinating conjunction only between the last two elements in a series of three or more.

10 tn Grk “whoever.”

11 sn In the Greek text greater is at the beginning of the clause in the emphatic position. John the Baptist was the greatest man of the old era.

12 tc The earliest and best mss read simply ᾿Ιωάννου (Iwannou, “John”) here (Ì75 א B L W Ξ Ë1 579 pc). Others turn this into “John the Baptist” (K 33 565 al it), “the prophet John the Baptist” (A [D] Θ Ë13 Ï lat), or “the prophet John” (Ψ 700 [892 1241] pc). “It appears that προφήτης was inserted by pedantic copyists who wished thereby to exclude Christ from the comparison, while others added τοῦ βαπτιστοῦ, assimilating the text to Mt 11.11” (TCGNT 119).

13 sn After John comes a shift of eras. The new era is so great that the lowest member of it (the one who is least in the kingdom of God) is greater than the greatest one of the previous era.

14 sn The kingdom of God is a major theme of Jesus’ proclamation. It is a realm in which Jesus rules and to which those who trust him belong. See Luke 6:20; 11:20; 17:20-21. It is not strictly future, though its full manifestation is yet to come. That is why membership in it starts right after John the Baptist.



TIP #08: Use the Strong Number links to learn about the original Hebrew and Greek text. [ALL]
created in 0.06 seconds
powered by bible.org