Luke 1:21

1:21 Now the people were waiting for Zechariah, and they began to wonder why he was delayed in the holy place.

Luke 1:63

1:63 He asked for a writing tablet and wrote, “His name is John.” And they were all amazed.

Luke 2:33

2:33 So the child’s father 10  and mother were amazed 11  at what was said about him.


tn Grk “And.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

tn The imperfect verb ἐθαύμαζον (eqaumazon) has been translated as an ingressive imperfect.

tn Or “temple.” See the note on the phrase “the holy place” in v. 9.

tn Grk “And he.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

sn The writing tablet requested by Zechariah would have been a wax tablet.

tn Grk “and wrote, saying.” The participle λέγων (legwn) is redundant is English and has not been translated.

sn The response, they were all amazed, expresses a mixture of surprise and reflection in this setting where they were so certain of what the child’s name would be.

tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the consequential nature of the action.

tn Grk “his”; the referent (the child) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

10 tc Most mss ([A] Θ [Ψ] Ë13 33 Ï it) read “Joseph,” but in favor of the reading ὁ πατὴρ αὐτοῦ (Jo pathr autou, “his father”) is both external (א B D L W 1 700 1241 pc sa) and internal evidence. Internally, the fact that Mary is not named at this point and that “Joseph” is an obviously motivated reading, intended to prevent confusion over the virgin conception of Christ, argues strongly for ὁ πατὴρ αὐτοῦ as the authentic reading here. See also the tc note on “parents” in 2:43.

11 tn The term refers to the amazement at what was happening as in other places in Luke 1–2 (1:63; 2:18). The participle is plural, while the finite verb used in the periphrastic construction is singular, perhaps to show a unity in the parents’ response (BDF §135.1.d: Luke 8:19).