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John 11:39

Context
11:39 Jesus said, “Take away the stone.” 1  Martha, the sister of the deceased, 2  replied, “Lord, by this time the body will have a bad smell, 3  because he has been buried 4  four days.” 5 

John 11:48

Context
11:48 If we allow him to go on in this way, 6  everyone will believe in him, and the Romans will come and take away our sanctuary 7  and our nation.”

John 16:22

Context
16:22 So also you have sorrow 8  now, but I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy away from you. 9 

John 17:15

Context
17:15 I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but that you keep them safe 10  from the evil one. 11 

1 tn Or “Remove the stone.”

2 tn Grk “the sister of the one who had died.”

3 tn Grk “already he stinks.”

4 tn Or “been there” (in the tomb – see John 11:17).

5 sn He has been buried four days. Although all the details of the miracle itself are not given, those details which are mentioned are important. The statement made by Martha is extremely significant for understanding what actually took place. There is no doubt that Lazarus had really died, because the decomposition of his body had already begun to take place, since he had been dead for four days.

6 tn Grk “If we let him do thus.”

7 tn Or “holy place”; Grk “our place” (a reference to the temple in Jerusalem).

8 tn Or “distress.”

9 sn An allusion to Isa 66:14 LXX, which reads: “Then you will see, and your heart will be glad, and your bones will flourish like the new grass; and the hand of the Lord will be made known to his servants, but he will be indignant toward his enemies.” The change from “you will see [me]” to I will see you places more emphasis on Jesus as the one who reinitiates the relationship with the disciples after his resurrection, but v. 16 (you will see me) is more like Isa 66:14. Further support for seeing this allusion as intentional is found in Isa 66:7, which uses the same imagery of the woman giving birth found in John 16:21. In the context of Isa 66 the passages refer to the institution of the messianic kingdom, and in fact the last clause of 66:14 along with the following verses (15-17) have yet to be fulfilled. This is part of the tension of present and future eschatological fulfillment that runs throughout the NT, by virtue of the fact that there are two advents. Some prophecies are fulfilled or partially fulfilled at the first advent, while other prophecies or parts of prophecies await fulfillment at the second.

10 tn Or “that you protect them”; Grk “that you keep them.”

11 tn The phrase “the evil one” is a reference to Satan. The genitive noun τοῦ πονηροῦ (tou ponhrou) is ambiguous with regard to gender: It may represent the neuter τὸ πονηρόν (to ponhron), “that which is evil,” or the masculine ὁ πονηρός (Jo ponhro"), “the evil one,” i.e., Satan. In view of the frequent use of the masculine in 1 John 2:13-14, 3:12, and 5:18-19 it seems much more probable that the masculine is to be understood here, and that Jesus is praying for his disciples to be protected from Satan. Cf. BDAG 851 s.v. πονηρός 1.b.β and 1.b.γ.



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