NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Job 11:15-19

Context

11:15 For 1  then you will lift up your face

without 2  blemish; 3 

you will be securely established 4 

and will not fear.

11:16 For you 5  will forget your trouble; 6 

you will remember it

like water that 7  has flowed away.

11:17 And life 8  will be brighter 9  than the noonday;

though there be darkness, 10 

it will be like the morning.

11:18 And you will be secure, because there is hope;

you will be protected 11 

and will take your rest in safety.

11:19 You will lie down with 12  no one to make you afraid,

and many will seek your favor. 13 

1 tn The absolute certainty of the statement is communicated with the addition of כִּי (ki) (see GKC 498 §159.ee).

2 tn For this use of the preposition מִן (min) see GKC 382 §119.w.

3 tn The word “lift up” is chosen to recall Job’s statement that he could not lift up his head (10:15); and the words “without spot” recall his words “filled with shame.” The sentence here says that he will lift up his face in innocence and show no signs of God’s anger on him.

4 tn The form מֻצָק (mutsaq) is a Hophal participle from יָצַק (yatsaq, “to pour”). The idea is that of metal being melted down and then poured to make a statue, and so hard, firm, solid. The LXX reads the verse, “for thus your face shall shine again, like pure water, and you shall divest yourself of uncleanness, and shall not fear.”

5 tn For a second time (see v. 13) Zophar employs the emphatic personal pronoun. Could he be providing a gentle reminder that Job might have forgotten the sin that has brought this trouble? After all, there will come a time when Job will not remember this time of trial.

6 sn It is interesting to note in the book that the resolution of Job’s trouble did not come in the way that Zophar prescribed it.

7 tn The perfect verb forms an abbreviated relative clause (without the pronoun) modifying “water.”

8 tn Some translations add the pronoun to make it specifically related to Job (“your life”), but this is not necessary. The word used here has the nuance of lasting life.

9 tn Heb “and more than the noonday life will arise.” The present translation is an interpretation in the context. The connotation of “arise” in comparison with the noonday, and in contrast with the darkness, supports the interpretation.

10 tn The form in the MT is the 3fsg imperfect verb, “[though] it be dark.” Most commentators revocalize the word to make it a noun (תְּעֻפָה, tÿufah), giving the meaning “the darkness [of your life] will be like the morning.” The contrast is with Job 10:22; here the darkness will shine like the morning.

11 tn The Hebrew verb means “to dig”; but this does not provide a good meaning for the verse. A. B. Davidson offers an interpretation of “search,” suggesting that before retiring at night Job would search and find everything in order. Some offer a better solution, namely, redefining the word on the basis of Arabic hafara, “to protect” and repointing it to וְחֻפַרְתָּ (vÿkhufarta, “you will be protected”). Other attempts to make sense of the line have involved the same process, but they are less convincing (for some of the more plausible proposals, see D. J. A. Clines, Job [WBC], 257).

12 tn The clause that reads “and there is no one making you afraid,” is functioning circumstantially here (see 5:4; 10:7).

13 tn Heb “they will stroke your face,” a picture drawn from the domestic scene of a child stroking the face of the parent. The verb is a Piel, meaning “stroke, make soft.” It is used in the Bible of seeking favor from God (supplication); but it may on the human level also mean seeking to sway people by flattery. See further D. R. Ap-Thomas, “Notes on Some Terms Relating to Prayer,” VT 6 (1956): 225-41.



TIP #01: Welcome to the NEXT Bible Web Interface and Study System!! [ALL]
created in 0.03 seconds
powered by bible.org