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Jeremiah 8:17

Context

8:17 The Lord says, 1 

“Yes indeed, 2  I am sending an enemy against you

that will be like poisonous snakes which cannot be charmed away. 3 

And they will inflict fatal wounds on you.” 4 

Jeremiah 30:3

Context
30:3 For I, the Lord, affirm 5  that the time will come when I will reverse the plight 6  of my people, Israel and Judah,’ says the Lord. ‘I will bring them back to the land I gave their ancestors 7  and they will take possession of it once again.’” 8 

Jeremiah 49:15

Context

49:15 The Lord says to Edom, 9 

“I will certainly make you small among nations.

I will make you despised by all humankind.

1 tn These words which are at the end of the Hebrew verse are brought forward to show at the outset the shift in speaker.

2 tn Heb “Indeed [or For] behold!” The translation is intended to convey some of the connection that is suggested by the Hebrew particle כִּי (ki) at the beginning of the verse.

3 tn Heb “I am sending against you snakes, poisonous ones which cannot be charmed.” In the light of the context literal snakes are scarcely meant. So the metaphor is turned into a simile to prevent possible confusion. For a similar metaphorical use of animals for enemies see 5:6.

4 tn Heb “they will bite you.” There does not appear to be any way to avoid the possible confusion that literal snakes are meant here except to paraphrase. Possibly one could say “And they will attack you and ‘bite’ you,” but the enclosing of the word “bite” in quotations might lead to even further confusion.

5 tn Heb “Oracle of the Lord.”

6 tn Heb “restore the fortune.” For the translation and meaning of this idiom see the note at 29:14.

7 tn Heb “fathers.”

8 sn As the nations of Israel and Judah were united in their sin and suffered the same fate – that of exile and dispersion – (cf. Jer 3:8; 5:11; 11:10, 17) so they will ultimately be regathered from the nations and rejoined under one king, a descendant of David, and regain possession of their ancestral lands. The prophets of both the eighth and seventh century looked forward to this ideal (see, e.g., Hos 1:11 (2:2 HT); Isa 11:11-13; Jer 23:5-6; 30:3; 33:7; Ezek 37:15-22). This has already been anticipated in Jer 3:18.

9 tn The words “The Lord says to Edom” are not in the text. They have been supplied in the translation to mark the shift from the address of the messenger summoning the nations to prepare to do battle against Edom. The Lord is clearly the speaker (see the end of v. 16) and Edom is clearly the addressee. Such sudden shifts are common in Hebrew poetry, particularly Hebrew prophecy, but are extremely disruptive to a modern reader trying to follow the argument of a passage. TEV adds “The Lord said” and then retains third person throughout. CEV puts all of vv. 14-16 in the second person and uses indirect discourse in v. 15.



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