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Jeremiah 4:10

Context

4:10 In response to all this 1  I said, “Ah, Lord God, 2  you have surely allowed 3  the people of Judah and Jerusalem 4  to be deceived by those who say, ‘You will be safe!’ 5  But in fact a sword is already at our throats.” 6 

Jeremiah 6:14

Context

6:14 They offer only superficial help

for the harm my people have suffered. 7 

They say, ‘Everything will be all right!’

But everything is not all right! 8 

Jeremiah 8:11

Context

8:11 They offer only superficial help

for the hurt my dear people 9  have suffered. 10 

They say, “Everything will be all right!”

But everything is not all right! 11 

Jeremiah 12:5

Context

12:5 The Lord answered, 12 

“If you have raced on foot against men and they have worn you out,

how will you be able to compete with horses?

And if you feel secure only 13  in safe and open country, 14 

how will you manage in the thick undergrowth along the Jordan River? 15 

Jeremiah 28:9

Context
28:9 So if a prophet prophesied 16  peace and prosperity, it was only known that the Lord truly sent him when what he prophesied came true.”

Jeremiah 29:7

Context
29:7 Work to see that the city where I sent you as exiles enjoys peace and prosperity. Pray to the Lord for it. For as it prospers you will prosper.’

1 tn The words “In response to all this” are not in the text but are supplied in the translation to clarify the connection.

2 tn Heb “Lord Yahweh.” The translation follows the ancient Jewish tradition of substituting the Hebrew word for God for the proper name Yahweh.

3 tn Or “You have deceived.” The Hiphil of נָשָׁא (nasha’, “to deceive”) is understood in a tolerative sense here: “to allow [someone] to be deceived.” IBHS 446 §27.5c notes that this function of the hiphil describes caused activity that is welcome to the undersubject, but unacceptable or disagreeable to a third party. Jerusalem and Judah welcomed the assurances of false prophets who deceived them. Although this was detestable to God, he allowed it.

4 tn Heb “this people and Jerusalem.”

5 tn Heb “Jerusalem, saying, ‘You will have peace’”; or “You have deceived the people of Judah and Jerusalem, saying, ‘You will have peace.’” The words “you will be safe” are, of course, those of the false prophets (cf., Jer 6:14; 8:11; 14:13; 23:16-17). It is difficult to tell whether the charge here is meant literally as the emotional outburst of the prophet (compare for example, Jer 15:18) or whether it is to be understood as a figure of speech in which a verb of direct causation is to be understood as permissive or tolerative, i.e., God did not command the prophets to say this but allowed them to do so. While it is not beyond God to use false prophets to accomplish his will (cf., e.g., 1 Kgs 22:19-23), he elsewhere in the book of Jeremiah directly denies having sent the false prophets to say such things as this (cf., e.g., Jer 14:14-15; 23:21, 32). For examples of the use of this figure of speech, see E. W. Bullinger, Figures of Speech, 571, 823 and compare Ezek 20:25. The translation given attempts to resolve the issue.

6 tn Heb “touches the throat/soul.” For this use of the word usually translated “soul” or “life” cf. HALOT 672 s.v. נֶפֶשׁ 1, 2 and compare the use in Ps 105:18.

7 tn Heb “They heal [= bandage] the wound of my people lightly”; TEV “They act as if my people’s wounds were only scratches.”

8 tn Heb “They say, ‘Peace! Peace!’ and there is no peace!”

9 tn Heb “daughter of my people.” For the translation given here see 4:11 and the note on the phrase “dear people” there.

10 tn Heb “They heal the wound of my people lightly.”

11 tn Heb “They say, ‘Peace! Peace!’ and there is no peace!”

12 tn The words “The Lord answered” are not in the text but are implicit from the context. They are supplied in the translation for clarity.

13 tn Some commentaries and English versions follow the suggestion given in HALOT 116 s.v. II בָּטַח that a homonym meaning “to stumble, fall down” is involved here and in Prov 14:16. The evidence for this homonym is questionable because both passages can be explained on other grounds with the usual root.

14 tn Heb “a land of tranquility.” The expression involves a figure of substitution where the feeling engendered is substituted for the conditions that engender it. For the idea see Isa 32:18. The translation both here and in the following line is intended to bring out the contrast implicit in the emotive connotations connected with “peaceful country” and “thicket along the Jordan.”

15 tn Heb “the thicket along the Jordan.” The word “River” is not in the Hebrew text, but has been supplied in the translation for clarity.

sn The thick undergrowth along the Jordan River refers to the thick woods and underbrush alongside the Jordan where lions were known to have lived, and hence the area was considered dangerous. See Jer 49:14; 50:44. The Lord here seems to be telling Jeremiah that the situation will only get worse. If he has trouble contending with the plot from his fellow townsmen, what will he do when the whole country sets up a cry against him?

16 tn The verbs in this verse are to be interpreted as iterative imperfects in past time rather than as futures because of the explicit contrast that is drawn in the two verses by the emphatic syntactical construction of the two verses. Both verses begin with a casus pendens construction to throw the two verses into contrast: HebThe prophets who were before me and you from ancient times, they prophesied…The prophet who prophesied peace, when the word of that prophet came true, that prophet was known that the Lord truly sent him.”



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