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Isaiah 5:25

Context

5:25 So the Lord is furious 1  with his people;

he lifts 2  his hand and strikes them.

The mountains shake,

and corpses lie like manure 3  in the middle of the streets.

Despite all this, his anger does not subside,

and his hand is ready to strike again. 4 

Isaiah 9:11

Context

9:11 Then the Lord provoked 5  their adversaries to attack them, 6 

he stirred up 7  their enemies –

Isaiah 9:16

Context

9:16 The leaders of this nation were misleading people,

and the people being led were destroyed. 8 

Isaiah 9:20

Context

9:20 They devoured 9  on the right, but were still hungry,

they ate on the left, but were not satisfied.

People even ate 10  the flesh of their own arm! 11 

Isaiah 10:4

Context

10:4 You will have no place to go, except to kneel with the prisoners,

or to fall among those who have been killed. 12 

Despite all this, his anger does not subside,

and his hand is ready to strike again. 13 

Isaiah 16:14

Context
16:14 Now the Lord makes this announcement: “Within exactly three years 14  Moab’s splendor will disappear, along with all her many people; there will be just a few, insignificant survivors left.” 15 

Isaiah 47:9

Context

47:9 Both of these will come upon you

suddenly, in one day!

You will lose your children and be widowed. 16 

You will be overwhelmed by these tragedies, 17 

despite 18  your many incantations

and your numerous amulets. 19 

1 tn Heb “the anger of the Lord rages.”

2 tn Or “extends”; KJV, ASV “he hath stretched forth.”

3 tn Or “garbage” (NCV, CEV, NLT); NAB, NASB, NIV “refuse.”

4 tn Heb “in all this his anger is not turned, and still his hand is outstretched.”

5 tn The translation assumes that the prefixed verb with vav (ו) consecutive continues the narrative of past judgment.

6 tc The Hebrew text reads literally, “adversaries of Rezin against him [i.e., them].” The next verse describes how the Syrians (over whom Rezin ruled, see 7:1, 8) and the Philistines encroached on Israel’s territory. Since the Syrians and Israelites were allies by 735 b.c. (see 7:1), the hostilities described probably occurred earlier, while Israel was still pro-Assyrian. In this case one might understand the phrase צָרֵי רְצִין (tsare rÿtsin, “adversaries of Rezin”) as meaning “adversaries sent from Rezin.” However, another option, the one chosen in the translation above, is to emend the phrase to צָרָיו (tsarayv, “his [i.e., their] adversaries”). This creates tighter parallelism with the next line (note “his [i.e., their] enemies”). The phrase in the Hebrew text may be explained as virtually dittographic.

7 tn The prefixed verbal form is understood as a preterite, used, as is often the case in poetry, without vav consecutive. Note that prefixed forms with vav consecutive both precede (וַיְשַׂגֵּב, vaysaggev, “and he provoked”) and follow in v. 12 (וַיֹּאכְלוּ, vayyokhÿlu, “and they devoured”) this verb.

8 tn Heb “and the ones being led were swallowed up.” Instead of taking מְבֻלָּעִים (mÿbullaim) from בָּלַע (bala’, “to swallow”), HALOT 134 s.v. בלע proposes a rare homonymic root בלע (“confuse”) here.

9 tn Or “cut.” The verb גָּזַר (gazar) means “to cut.” If it is understood here, then one might paraphrase, “They slice off meat on the right.” However, HALOT 187 s.v. I גזר, proposes here a rare homonym meaning “to devour.”

10 tn The prefixed verbal form is either a preterite without vav consecutive or an imperfect used in a customary sense, describing continual or repeated behavior in past time.

11 tn Some suggest that זְרֹעוֹ (zÿroo, “his arm”) be repointed זַרְעוֹ (zaro, “his offspring”). In either case, the metaphor is that of a desperately hungry man who resorts to an almost unthinkable act to satisfy his appetite. He eats everything he can find to his right, but still being unsatisfied, then turns to his left and eats everything he can find there. Still being desperate for food, he then resorts to eating his own flesh (or offspring, as this phrase is metaphorically understood by some English versions, e.g., NIV, NCV, TEV, NLT). The reality behind the metaphor is the political turmoil of the period, as the next verse explains. There was civil strife within the northern kingdom; even the descendants of Joseph were at each other’s throats. Then the northern kingdom turned on their southern brother, Judah.

12 tn Heb “except one kneels in the place of the prisoner, and in the place of the slain [who] fall.” On the force of בִּלְתִּי (bilti, “except”) and its logical connection to what precedes, see BDB 116 s.v. בֵלֶת. On the force of תַּחַת (takhat, “in the place of”) here, see J. N. Oswalt, Isaiah (NICOT), 1:258, n. 6.

13 tn Heb “in all this his anger was not turned, and still his hand was outstretched”; KJV, ASV, NRSV “his had is stretched out still.”

sn See the note at 9:12.

14 tn Heb “in three years, like the years of a hired worker.” The three years must be reckoned exactly, just as a hired worker would carefully keep track of the time he had agreed to work for an employer in exchange for a predetermined wage.

15 tn Heb “and the splendor of Moab will be disgraced with all the great multitude, and a small little remnant will not be strong.”

16 tn Heb “loss of children and widowhood.” In the Hebrew text the phrase is in apposition to “both of these” in line 1.

17 tn Heb “according to their fullness, they will come upon you.”

18 tn For other examples of the preposition bet (בְּ) having the sense of “although, despite,” see BDB 90 s.v. III.7.

19 sn Reference is made to incantations and amulets, both of which were important in Mesopotamian religion. They were used to ward off danger and demons.



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