NETBible KJV GRK-HEB XRef Arts Hymns
  Discovery Box

Isaiah 22:1-9

Context
The Lord Will Judge Jerusalem

22:1 Here is a message about the Valley of Vision: 1 

What is the reason 2 

that all of you go up to the rooftops?

22:2 The noisy city is full of raucous sounds;

the town is filled with revelry. 3 

Your slain were not cut down by the sword;

they did not die in battle. 4 

22:3 5 All your leaders ran away together –

they fled to a distant place;

all your refugees 6  were captured together –

they were captured without a single arrow being shot. 7 

22:4 So I say:

“Don’t look at me! 8 

I am weeping bitterly.

Don’t try 9  to console me

concerning the destruction of my defenseless people.” 10 

22:5 For the sovereign master, 11  the Lord who commands armies,

has planned a day of panic, defeat, and confusion. 12 

In the Valley of Vision 13  people shout 14 

and cry out to the hill. 15 

22:6 The Elamites picked up the quiver,

and came with chariots and horsemen; 16 

the men of Kir 17  prepared 18  the shield. 19 

22:7 Your very best valleys were full of chariots; 20 

horsemen confidently took their positions 21  at the gate.

22:8 They 22  removed the defenses 23  of Judah.

At that time 24  you looked

for the weapons in the House of the Forest. 25 

22:9 You saw the many breaks

in the walls of the city of David; 26 

you stored up water in the lower pool.

1 sn The following message pertains to Jerusalem. The significance of referring to the city as the Valley of Vision is uncertain. Perhaps the Hinnom Valley is in view, but why it is associated with a prophetic revelatory “vision” is not entirely clear. Maybe the Hinnom Valley is called this because the destruction that will take place there is the focal point of this prophetic message (see v. 5).

2 tn Heb “What to you, then?”

3 tn Heb “the boisterous town.” The phrase is parallel to “the noisy city” in the preceding line.

4 sn Apparently they died from starvation during the siege that preceded the final conquest of the city. See J. N. Oswalt, Isaiah (NICOT), 1:409.

5 tn Verse 3 reads literally, “All your leaders ran away, apart from a bow they were captured, all your found ones were captured together, to a distant place they fled.” J. N. Oswalt (Isaiah [NICOT], 1:403, n. 3) suggests that the lines of the verse are arranged chiastically; lines 1 and 4 go together, while lines 2 and 3 are parallel. To translate the lines in the order they appear in the Hebrew text is misleading to the English reader, who is likely unfamiliar with, or at least insensitive to, chiastic parallelism. Consequently, the translation above arranges the lines as follows: line 1 (Hebrew) = line 1 (in translation); line 2 (Hebrew) = line 4 (in translation); line 3 (Hebrew) = line 3 (in translation); line 4 (Hebrew) = line 2 (in translation).

6 tn Heb “all your found ones.” To achieve tighter parallelism (see “your leaders”) some prefer to emend the form to אַמִּיצַיִךְ (’ammitsayikh, “your strong ones”) or to נֶאֱמָצַיִךְ (neematsayikh, “your strengthened ones”).

7 tn Heb “apart from [i.e., without] a bow they were captured”; cf. NAB, NRSV “without the use of a bow.”

8 tn Heb “look away from me” (so KJV, ASV, NRSV).

9 tn Heb “don’t hurry” (so NCV).

10 tn Heb “the daughter of my people.” “Daughter” is here used metaphorically to express the speaker’s emotional attachment to his people, as well as their vulnerability and weakness.

11 tn The Hebrew term translated “sovereign master” here and in vv. 12, 14, 15 is אֲדֹנָי (’adonay).

12 tn Heb “For [there is] a day of panic, and trampling, and confusion for the master, the Lord who commands armies [traditionally, the Lord of hosts].”

13 tn The traditional accentuation of the Hebrew text suggests that this phrase goes with what precedes.

14 tn The precise meaning of this statement is unclear. Some take קִר (qir) as “wall” and interpret the verb to mean “tear down.” However, tighter parallelism (note the reference to crying for help in the next line) is achieved if one takes both the verb and noun from a root, attested in Ugaritic and Arabic, meaning “make a sound.” See J. N. Oswalt, Isaiah (NICOT), 1:404, n. 5.

15 sn Perhaps “the hill” refers to the temple mount.

16 tn Heb “[with] the chariots of men, horsemen.”

17 sn A distant region in the direction of Mesopotamia; see Amos 1:5; 9:7.

18 tn Heb “Kir uncovers” (so NAB, NIV).

19 sn The Elamites and men of Kir may here symbolize a fierce army from a distant land. If this oracle anticipates a Babylonian conquest of the city (see 39:5-7), then the Elamites and men of Kir are perhaps viewed here as mercenaries in the Babylonian army. See J. N. Oswalt, Isaiah (NICOT), 1:410.

20 tn The verb that introduces this verse serves as a discourse particle and is untranslated; see note on “in the future” in 2:2.

21 tn Heb “taking a stand, take their stand.” The infinitive absolute emphasizes the following finite verb. The translation attempts to bring out this emphasis with the adverb “confidently.”

22 tn Heb “he,” i.e., the enemy invader. NASB, by its capitalization of the pronoun, takes this to refer to the Lord.

23 tn Heb “covering.”

24 tn Heb “in that day” (so KJV), likewise at the beginning of v. 12.

25 sn Perhaps this refers to a royal armory, or to Solomon’s “House of the Forest of Lebanon,” where weapons may have been kept (see 1 Kgs 10:16-17).

26 tn Heb “the breaks of the city of David, you saw that they were many.”



TIP #09: Tell your friends ... become a ministry partner ... use the NET Bible on your site. [ALL]
created in 0.08 seconds
powered by bible.org