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Exodus 21:12-14

Context
Personal Injuries

21:12 1 “Whoever strikes someone 2  so that he dies 3  must surely be put to death. 4  21:13 But if he does not do it with premeditation, 5  but it happens by accident, 6  then I will appoint for you a place where he may flee. 21:14 But if a man willfully attacks his neighbor to kill him cunningly, 7  you will take him even from my altar that he may die.

Exodus 21:20

Context

21:20 “If a man strikes his male servant or his female servant with a staff so that he or she 8  dies as a result of the blow, 9  he will surely be punished. 10 

Exodus 21:22

Context

21:22 “If men fight and hit a pregnant woman and her child is born prematurely, 11  but there is no serious injury, he will surely be punished in accordance with what the woman’s husband demands of him, and he will pay what the court decides. 12 

Exodus 21:28

Context
Laws about Animals

21:28 13 “If an ox 14  gores a man or a woman so that either dies, 15  then the ox must surely 16  be stoned and its flesh must not be eaten, but the owner of the ox will be acquitted.

1 sn The underlying point of this section remains vital today: The people of God must treat all human life as sacred.

2 tn The construction uses a Hiphil participle in construct with the noun for “man” (or person as is understood in a law for the nation): “the one striking [of] a man.” This is a casus pendens (independent nominative absolute); it indicates the condition or action that involves further consequence (GKC 361 §116.w).

3 tn The Hebrew word וָמֵת (vamet) is a Qal perfect with vav consecutive; it means “and he dies” and not “and killed him” (which require another stem). Gesenius notes that this form after a participle is the equivalent of a sentence representing a contingent action (GKC 333 §112.n). The word shows the result of the action in the opening participle. It is therefore a case of murder or manslaughter.

4 sn See A. Phillips, “Another Look at Murder,” JJS 28 (1977): 105-26.

5 tn Heb “if he does not lie in wait” (NASB similar).

6 tn Heb “and God brought into his hand.” The death is unintended, its circumstances outside human control.

7 tn The word עָרְמָה (’ormah) is problematic. It could mean with prior intent, which would be connected with the word in Prov 8:5, 12 which means “understanding” (or “prudence” – fully aware of the way things are). It could be connected also to an Arabic word for “enemy” which would indicate this was done with malice or evil intentions (U. Cassuto, Exodus, 270). The use here seems parallel to the one in Josh 9:4, an instance involving intentionality and clever deception.

8 tn Heb “so that he”; the words “or she” have been supplied in the translation for stylistic reasons.

9 tn Heb “under his hand.”

10 tn Heb “will be avenged” (how is not specified).

11 tn This line has occasioned a good deal of discussion. It may indicate that the child was killed, as in a miscarriage; or it may mean that there was a premature birth. The latter view is taken here because of the way the whole section is written: (1) “her children come out” reflects a birth and not the loss of children, (2) there is no serious damage, and (3) payment is to be set for any remuneration. The word אָסוֹן (’ason) is translated “serious damage.” The word was taken in Mekilta to mean “death.” U. Cassuto says the point of the phrase is that neither the woman or the children that are born die (Exodus, 275). But see among the literature on this: M. G. Kline, “Lex Talionis and the Human Fetus,” JETS 20 (1977): 193-201; W. House, “Miscarriage or Premature Birth: Additional Thoughts on Exodus 21:22-25,” WTJ 41 (1978): 108-23; S. E. Loewenstamm, “Exodus XXI 22-25,” VT 27 (1977): 352-60.

12 tn The word בִּפְלִלִים (biflilim) means “with arbitrators.” The point then seems to be that the amount of remuneration for damages that was fixed by the husband had to be approved by the courts. S. R. Driver mentions an alternative to this unusual reading presented by Budde, reading בנפלים as “untimely birth” (Exodus, 219). See also E. A. Speiser, “The Stem PLL in Hebrew,” JBL 82 (1963): 301-6.

13 sn The point that this section of the laws makes is that one must ensure the safety of others by controlling the circumstances.

14 tn Traditionally “ox,” but “bull” would also be suitable. The term may refer to one of any variety of large cattle.

15 tn Heb “and he dies”; KJV “that they die”; NAB, NASB “to death.”

16 tn The text uses סָקוֹל יִסָּקֵל (saqol yissaqel), a Qal infinitive absolute with a Niphal imperfect. The infinitive intensifies the imperfect, which here has an obligatory nuance or is a future of instruction.



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