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Exodus 10:4

Context
10:4 But if you refuse to release my people, I am going to bring 1  locusts 2  into your territory 3  tomorrow.

Exodus 10:14

Context
10:14 The locusts went up over all the land of Egypt and settled down in all the territory 4  of Egypt. It was very severe; 5  there had been no locusts like them before, nor will there be such ever again. 6 

Exodus 10:19

Context
10:19 and the Lord turned a very strong west wind, 7  and it picked up the locusts and blew them into the Red Sea. 8  Not one locust remained in all the territory of Egypt.

Exodus 13:7

Context
13:7 Bread made without yeast must be eaten 9  for seven days; 10  no bread made with yeast shall be seen 11  among you, and you must have no yeast among you within any of your borders.

1 tn הִנְנִי (hinni) before the active participle מֵבִיא (mevi’) is the imminent future construction: “I am about to bring” or “I am going to bring” – precisely, “here I am bringing.”

2 tn One of the words for “locusts” in the Bible is אַרְבֶּה (’arbeh), which comes from רָבָה (ravah, “to be much, many”). It was used for locusts because of their immense numbers.

3 tn Heb “within your border.”

4 tn Heb “border.”

5 tn This is an interpretive translation. The clause simply has כָּבֵד מְאֹד (kaved mÿod), the stative verb with the adverb – “it was very heavy.” The description prepares for the following statement about the uniqueness of this locust infestation.

6 tn Heb “after them.”

7 tn Or perhaps “sea wind,” i.e., a wind off the Mediterranean.

8 tn The Hebrew name here is יַם־סוּף (Yam Suf), sometimes rendered “Reed Sea” or “Sea of Reeds.” The word סוּף is a collective noun that may have derived from an Egyptian name for papyrus reeds. Many English versions have used “Red Sea,” which translates the name that ancient Greeks used: ejruqrav qalavssa (eruqra qalassa).

sn The name Red Sea is currently applied to the sea west of the Arabian Peninsula. The northern fingers of this body of water extend along the west and east sides of the Sinai Peninsula and are presently called the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Aqaba or the Gulf of Eilat. In ancient times the name applied to a much larger body of water, including the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf (C. Houtman, Exodus, 1:109-10). See also Num 14:25; 21:4; Deut 1:40; 2:1; Judg 11:16; 1 Kgs 9:26; Jer 49:21. The sea was deep enough to drown the entire Egyptian army later (and thus no shallow swamp land). God drives the locusts to their death in the water. He will have the same power over Egyptian soldiers, for he raised up this powerful empire for a purpose and soon will drown them in the sea. The message for the Israelites is that God will humble all who refuse to submit.

9 tn The imperfect has the nuance of instruction or injunction again, but it could also be given an obligatory nuance.

10 tn The construction is an adverbial accusative of time, answering how long the routine should be followed (see GKC 374 §118.k).

11 tn Or “visible to you” (B. Jacob, Exodus, 366).



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