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Deuteronomy 4:23

Context
4:23 Be on guard so that you do not forget the covenant of the Lord your God that he has made with you, and that you do not make an image of any kind, just as he 1  has forbidden 2  you.

Deuteronomy 4:31

Context
4:31 (for he 3  is a merciful God), he will not let you down 4  or destroy you, for he cannot 5  forget the covenant with your ancestors that he confirmed by oath to them.

Deuteronomy 5:2-3

Context
5:2 The Lord our God made a covenant with us at Horeb. 5:3 He 6  did not make this covenant with our ancestors 7  but with us, we who are here today, all of us living now.

Deuteronomy 7:9

Context
7:9 So realize that the Lord your God is the true God, 8  the faithful God who keeps covenant faithfully 9  with those who love him and keep his commandments, to a thousand generations,

Deuteronomy 7:12

Context
Promises of Good for Covenant Obedience

7:12 If you obey these ordinances and are careful to do them, the Lord your God will faithfully keep covenant with you 10  as he promised 11  your ancestors.

Deuteronomy 8:18

Context
8:18 You must remember the Lord your God, for he is the one who gives ability to get wealth; if you do this he will confirm his covenant that he made by oath to your ancestors, 12  even as he has to this day.

Deuteronomy 9:9-11

Context
9:9 When I went up the mountain to receive the stone tablets, the tablets of the covenant that the Lord made with you, I remained there 13  forty days and nights, eating and drinking nothing. 9:10 The Lord gave me the two stone tablets, written by the very finger 14  of God, and on them was everything 15  he 16  said to you at the mountain from the midst of the fire at the time of that assembly. 9:11 Now at the end of the forty days and nights the Lord presented me with the two stone tablets, the tablets of the covenant.

Deuteronomy 9:15

Context

9:15 So I turned and went down the mountain while it 17  was blazing with fire; the two tablets of the covenant were in my hands.

Deuteronomy 10:2

Context
10:2 I will write on the tablets the same words 18  that were on the first tablets you broke, and you must put them into the ark.”

Deuteronomy 10:4-5

Context
10:4 The Lord 19  then wrote on the tablets the same words, 20  the ten commandments, 21  which he 22  had spoken to you at the mountain from the middle of the fire at the time of that assembly, and he 23  gave them to me. 10:5 Then I turned, went down the mountain, and placed the tablets into the ark I had made – they are still there, just as the Lord commanded me.

Deuteronomy 10:8

Context
10:8 At that time the Lord set apart the tribe of Levi 24  to carry the ark of the Lord’s covenant, to stand before the Lord to serve him, and to formulate blessings 25  in his name, as they do to this very day.

Deuteronomy 17:2

Context
17:2 Suppose a man or woman is discovered among you – in one of your villages 26  that the Lord your God is giving you – who sins before the Lord your God 27  and breaks his covenant

Deuteronomy 29:1

Context
Narrative Interlude

29:1 (28:69) 28  These are the words of the covenant that the Lord commanded Moses to make with the people of Israel in the land of Moab, in addition to the covenant he had made with them at Horeb. 29 

Deuteronomy 29:9

Context
The Present Covenant Setting

29:9 “Therefore, keep the terms 30  of this covenant and obey them so that you may be successful in everything you do.

Deuteronomy 29:12

Context
29:12 so that you may enter by oath into the covenant the Lord your God is making with you today. 31 

Deuteronomy 29:14-15

Context
29:14 It is not with you alone that I am making this covenant by oath, 29:15 but with whoever stands with us here today before the Lord our God as well as those not with us here today. 32 

Deuteronomy 29:18

Context
29:18 Beware that the heart of no man, woman, clan, or tribe among you turns away from the Lord our God today to pursue and serve the gods of those nations; beware that there is among you no root producing poisonous and bitter fruit. 33 

Deuteronomy 29:21

Context
29:21 The Lord will single him out 34  for judgment 35  from all the tribes of Israel according to all the curses of the covenant written in this scroll of the law.

Deuteronomy 29:25

Context
29:25 Then people will say, “Because they abandoned the covenant of the Lord, the God of their ancestors, which he made with them when he brought them out of the land of Egypt.

Deuteronomy 31:9

Context
The Deposit of the Covenant Text

31:9 Then Moses wrote down this law and gave it to the Levitical priests, who carry the ark of the Lord’s covenant, and to all Israel’s elders.

Deuteronomy 31:16

Context
31:16 Then the Lord said to Moses, “You are about to die, 36  and then these people will begin to prostitute themselves with the foreign gods of the land into which they 37  are going. They 38  will reject 39  me and break my covenant that I have made with them. 40 

Deuteronomy 31:20

Context
31:20 For after I have brought them 41  to the land I promised to their 42  ancestors – one flowing with milk and honey – and they 43  eat their fill 44  and become fat, then they 45  will turn to other gods and worship them; they will reject me and break my covenant.

Deuteronomy 31:25-26

Context
31:25 he 46  commanded the Levites who carried the ark of the Lord’s covenant, 31:26 “Take this scroll of the law and place it beside the ark of the covenant of the Lord your God. It will remain there as a witness against you,

Deuteronomy 33:9

Context

33:9 He said to his father and mother, “I have not seen him,” 47 

and he did not acknowledge his own brothers

or know his own children,

for they kept your word,

and guarded your covenant.

1 tn Heb “the Lord your God.” See note on “he” in 4:3.

2 tn Heb “commanded.”

3 tn Heb “the Lord your God.” See note on “he” in 4:3.

4 tn Heb “he will not drop you,” i.e., “will not abandon you” (cf. NAB, NIV, NRSV, NLT).

5 tn Or “will not.” The translation understands the imperfect verbal form to have an added nuance of capability here.

6 tn Heb “the Lord.” The pronoun has been used in the translation for stylistic reasons to avoid redundancy.

7 tn Heb “fathers.”

8 tn Heb “the God.” The article here expresses uniqueness; cf. TEV “is the only God”; NLT “is indeed God.”

9 tn Heb “who keeps covenant and loyalty.” The syndetic construction of בְּרִית (bÿrit) and חֶסֶד (khesed) should be understood not as “covenant” plus “loyalty” but as an adverbial construction in which חֶסֶד (“loyalty”) modifies the verb שָׁמַר (shamar, “keeps”).

10 tn Heb “will keep with you the covenant and loyalty.” On the construction used here, see v. 9.

11 tn Heb “which he swore on oath.” The relative pronoun modifies “covenant,” so one could translate “will keep faithfully the covenant (or promise) he made on oath to your ancestors.”

12 tc Smr and Lucian add “Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob,” the standard way of rendering this almost stereotypical formula (cf. Deut 1:8; 6:10; 9:5, 27; 29:13; 30:20; 34:4). The MT’s harder reading presumptively argues for its originality, however.

13 tn Heb “in the mountain.” The demonstrative pronoun has been used in the translation for stylistic reasons.

14 sn The very finger of God. This is a double figure of speech (1) in which God is ascribed human features (anthropomorphism) and (2) in which a part stands for the whole (synecdoche). That is, God, as Spirit, has no literal finger nor, if he had, would he write with his finger. Rather, the sense is that God himself – not Moses in any way – was responsible for the composition of the Ten Commandments (cf. Exod 31:18; 32:16; 34:1).

15 tn Heb “according to all the words.”

16 tn Heb “the Lord” (likewise at the beginning of vv. 12, 13). See note on “he” in 9:3.

17 tn Heb “the mountain.” The translation uses a pronoun for stylistic reasons to avoid redundancy.

18 sn The same words. The care with which the replacement copy must be made underscores the importance of verbal precision in relaying the Lord’s commandments.

19 tn Heb “he”; the referent (the Lord) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

20 tn Heb “according to the former writing.” See note on the phrase “the same words” in v. 2.

21 tn Heb “ten words.” The “Ten Commandments” are known in Hebrew as the “Ten Words,” which in Greek became the “Decalogue.”

22 tn Heb “the Lord.” The pronoun has been used in the translation for stylistic reasons to avoid redundancy.

23 tn Heb “the Lord.” See note on “he” earlier in this verse.

24 sn The Lord set apart the tribe of Levi. This was not the initial commissioning of the tribe of Levi to this ministry (cf. Num 3:11-13; 8:12-26), but with Aaron’s death it seemed appropriate to Moses to reiterate Levi’s responsibilities. There is no reference in the Book of Numbers to this having been done, but the account of Eleazar’s succession to the priesthood there (Num 20:25-28) would provide a setting for this to have occurred.

25 sn To formulate blessings. The most famous example of this is the priestly “blessing formula” of Num 6:24-26.

26 tn Heb “gates.”

27 tn Heb “does the evil in the eyes of the Lord your God.”

28 sn Beginning with 29:1, the verse numbers through 29:29 in the English Bible differ from the verse numbers in the Hebrew text (BHS), with 29:1 ET = 28:69 HT, 29:2 ET = 29:1 HT, 29:3 ET = 29:2 HT, etc., through 29:29 ET = 29:28 HT. With 30:1 the verse numbers in the ET and HT are again the same.

29 sn Horeb is another name for Mount Sinai (which some English versions substitute here for clarity, cf. NCV, TEV, CEV, NLT).

30 tn Heb “words.”

31 tn Heb “for you to pass on into the covenant of the Lord your God and into his oath, which the Lord your God is cutting with you today.”

32 tn This is interpreted by some English versions as a reference to generations not yet born (cf. TEV, CEV, NLT).

33 tn Heb “yielding fruit poisonous and wormwood.” The Hebrew noun לַעֲנָה (laanah) literally means “wormwood” (so KJV, ASV, NAB, NASB), but is used figuratively for anything extremely bitter, thus here “fruit poisonous and bitter.”

34 tn Heb “set him apart.”

35 tn Heb “for evil”; NAB “for doom”; NASB “for adversity”; NIV “for disaster”; NRSV “for calamity.”

36 tn Heb “lie down with your fathers” (so NASB); NRSV “ancestors.”

37 tn Heb “he.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “they,” which is necessary in any case in the translation because of contemporary English style. The third person singular also occurs in the Hebrew text twice more in this verse, three times in v. 17, once in v. 18, five times in v. 20, and four times in v. 21. Each time it is translated as third person plural for stylistic reasons.

38 tn Heb “he.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “they.” See note on the first occurrence of “they” in v. 16.

39 tn Or “abandon” (TEV, NLT).

40 tn Heb “him.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “them.” See note on the first occurrence of “they” in v. 16.

41 tn Heb “him.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “them.” See note on the first occurrence of “they” in v. 16.

42 tn Heb “his.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “their.” See note on the first occurrence of “they” in v. 16.

43 tn Heb “he.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “they.” See note on the first occurrence of “they” in v. 16.

44 tn Heb “and are satisfied.”

45 tn Heb “he.” Smr, LXX, and the Targums read the plural “they.” See note on the first occurrence of “they” in v. 16.

46 tn Heb “Moses.” The pronoun has been used in the translation for stylistic reasons to avoid redundancy.

47 sn This statement no doubt alludes to the Levites’ destruction of their own fellow tribesmen following the golden calf incident (Exod 32:25-29).



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