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Deuteronomy 14:7-8

Context
14:7 However, you may not eat the following animals among those that chew the cud or those that have divided hooves: the camel, the hare, and the rock badger. 1  (Although they chew the cud, they do not have divided hooves and are therefore ritually impure to you). 14:8 Also the pig is ritually impure to you; though it has divided hooves, 2  it does not chew the cud. You may not eat their meat or even touch their remains.

Deuteronomy 14:10

Context
14:10 but whatever does not have fins and scales you may not eat; it is ritually impure to you.

Deuteronomy 14:12-20

Context
14:12 These are the ones you may not eat: the eagle, 3  the vulture, 4  the black vulture, 5  14:13 the kite, the black kite, the dayyah 6  after its species, 14:14 every raven after its species, 14:15 the ostrich, 7  the owl, 8  the seagull, the falcon 9  after its species, 14:16 the little owl, the long-eared owl, the white owl, 10  14:17 the jackdaw, 11  the carrion vulture, the cormorant, 14:18 the stork, the heron after its species, the hoopoe, the bat, 14:19 and any winged thing on the ground are impure to you – they may not be eaten. 12  14:20 You may eat any clean bird.

1 tn The Hebrew term שָׁפָן (shafan) may refer to the “coney” (cf. KJV, NIV) or hyrax (“rock badger,” cf. NAB, NASB, NRSV, NLT).

2 tc The MT lacks (probably by haplography) the phrase וְשֹׁסַע שֶׁסַע פַּרְסָה (vÿshosashesaparsah, “and is clovenfooted,” i.e., “has parted hooves”), a phrase found in the otherwise exact parallel in Lev 11:7. The LXX and Smr attest the longer reading here. The meaning is, however, clear without it.

3 tn NEB “the griffon-vulture.”

4 tn The Hebrew term פֶּרֶס (peres) describes a large vulture otherwise known as the ossifrage (cf. KJV). This largest of the vultures takes its name from its habit of dropping skeletal remains from a great height so as to break the bones apart.

5 tn The Hebrew term עָזְנִיָּה (’ozniyyah) may describe the black vulture (so NIV) or it may refer to the osprey (so NAB, NRSV, NLT), an eagle-like bird subsisting mainly on fish.

6 tn The Hebrew term is דַּיָּה (dayyah). This, with the previous two terms (רָאָה [raah] and אַיָּה [’ayyah]), is probably a kite of some species but otherwise impossible to specify.

7 tn Or “owl.” The Hebrew term בַּת הַיַּעֲנָה (bat hayyaanah) is sometimes taken as “ostrich” (so ASV, NAB, NASB, NRSV, NLT), but may refer instead to some species of owl (cf. KJV “owl”; NEB “desert-owl”; NIV “horned owl”).

8 tn The Hebrew term תַּחְמָס (takhmas) is either a type of owl (cf. NEB “short-eared owl”; NIV “screech owl”) or possibly the nighthawk (so NRSV, NLT).

9 tn The Hebrew term נֵץ (nets) may refer to the falcon or perhaps the hawk (so NEB, NIV).

10 tn The Hebrew term תִּנְשֶׁמֶת (tinshemet) may refer to a species of owl (cf. ASV “horned owl”; NASB, NIV, NLT “white owl”) or perhaps even to the swan (so KJV); cf. NRSV “water hen.”

11 tn The Hebrew term קָאַת (qaat) may also refer to a type of owl (NAB, NIV, NRSV “desert owl”) or perhaps the pelican (so KJV, NASB, NLT).

12 tc The MT reads the Niphal (passive) for expected Qal (“you [plural] must not eat”); cf. Smr, LXX. However, the harder reading should stand.



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