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Deuteronomy 13:5

Context
13:5 As for that prophet or dreamer, 1  he must be executed because he encouraged rebellion against the Lord your God who brought you from the land of Egypt, redeeming you from that place of slavery, and because he has tried to entice you from the way the Lord your God has commanded you to go. In this way you must purge out evil from within. 2 

Deuteronomy 13:9

Context
13:9 Instead, you must kill him without fail! 3  Your own hand must be the first to strike him, 4  and then the hands of the whole community.

Deuteronomy 20:13

Context
20:13 The Lord your God will deliver it over to you 5  and you must kill every single male by the sword.

Deuteronomy 20:16-17

Context
Laws Concerning War with Canaanite Nations

20:16 As for the cities of these peoples that 6  the Lord your God is going to give you as an inheritance, you must not allow a single living thing 7  to survive. 20:17 Instead you must utterly annihilate them 8  – the Hittites, 9  Amorites, 10  Canaanites, 11  Perizzites, 12  Hivites, 13  and Jebusites 14  – just as the Lord your God has commanded you,

1 tn Heb “or dreamer of dreams.” See note on this expression in v. 1.

2 tn Heb “your midst” (so NAB, NRSV). The severity of the judgment here (i.e., capital punishment) is because of the severity of the sin, namely, high treason against the Great King. Idolatry is a violation of the first two commandments (Deut 5:6-10) as well as the spirit and intent of the Shema (Deut 6:4-5).

3 tn The Hebrew text uses the infinitive absolute for emphasis, which the translation indicates with the words “without fail” (cf. NIV “you must certainly put him to death”).

4 tn Heb “to put him to death,” but this is misleading in English for such an action would leave nothing for the others to do.

5 tn Heb “to your hands.”

6 tn The antecedent of the relative pronoun is “cities.”

7 tn Heb “any breath.”

8 tn The Hebrew text uses the infinitive absolute for emphasis, which the translation seeks to reflect with “utterly.” Cf. CEV “completely wipe out.”

sn The Hebrew verb refers to placing persons or things so evil and/or impure as to be irredeemable under God’s judgment, usually to the extent of their complete destruction. See also the note on the phrase “the divine judgment” in Deut 2:34.

9 sn Hittite. The center of Hittite power was in Anatolia (central modern Turkey). In the Late Bronze Age (1550-1200 b.c.) they were at their zenith, establishing outposts and colonies near and far. Some elements were obviously in Canaan at the time of the Conquest (1400-1350 b.c.).

10 sn Amorite. Originally from the upper Euphrates region (Amurru), the Amorites appear to have migrated into Canaan beginning in 2200 b.c. or thereabouts.

11 sn Canaanite. These were the indigenous peoples of the land of Palestine, going back to the beginning of recorded history (ca. 3000 b.c.). The OT identifies them as descendants of Ham (Gen 10:6), the only Hamites to have settled north and east of Egypt.

12 sn Perizzite. This probably refers to a subgroup of Canaanites (Gen 13:7; 34:30).

13 sn Hivite. These are usually thought to be the same as the Hurrians, a people well-known in ancient Near Eastern texts. They are likely identical to the Horites (see note on “Horites” in Deut 2:12).

14 tc The LXX adds “Girgashites” here at the end of the list in order to list the full (and usual) complement of seven (see note on “seven” in Deut 7:1).

sn Jebusite. These people inhabited the hill country, particularly in and about Jerusalem (cf. Num 13:29; Josh 15:8; 2 Sam 5:6; 24:16).



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