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Acts 3:6

Context
3:6 But Peter said, “I have no silver or gold, 1  but what I do have I give you. In the name 2  of Jesus Christ 3  the Nazarene, stand up and 4  walk!”

Acts 3:13-16

Context
3:13 The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, 5  the God of our forefathers, 6  has glorified 7  his servant 8  Jesus, whom you handed over and rejected 9  in the presence of Pilate after he had decided 10  to release him. 3:14 But you rejected 11  the Holy and Righteous One and asked that a man who was a murderer be released to you. 3:15 You killed 12  the Originator 13  of life, whom God raised 14  from the dead. To this fact we are witnesses! 15  3:16 And on the basis of faith in Jesus’ 16  name, 17  his very name has made this man – whom you see and know – strong. The 18  faith that is through Jesus 19  has given him this complete health in the presence 20  of you all.

1 tn Or “I have no money.” L&N 6.69 classifies the expression ἀργύριον καὶ χρυσίον (argurion kai crusion) as an idiom that is a generic expression for currency, thus “money.”

2 sn In the name. Note the authority in the name of Jesus the Messiah. His presence and power are at work for the man. The reference to “the name” is not like a magical incantation, but is designed to indicate the agent who performs the healing. The theme is quite frequent in Acts (2:38 plus 21 other times).

3 tn Or “Messiah”; both “Christ” (Greek) and “Messiah” (Hebrew and Aramaic) mean “one who has been anointed.”

4 tc The words “stand up and” (ἔγειρε καί, egeire kai) are not in a few mss (א B D sa), but are included in A C E Ψ 095 33 1739 Ï lat sy mae bo. The external testimony is thus fairly evenly divided, with few but important representatives of the Alexandrian and Western texttypes supporting the shorter reading. Internally, the words look like a standard scribal emendation, and may have been motivated by other healing passages where Jesus gave a similar double command (cf. Matt 9:5; Mark 2:9, [11]; Luke 5:23; [6:8]; John 5:8). On the other hand, there is some motivation for deleting ἔγειρε καί here, namely, unlike Jesus’ healing miracles, Peter raises (ἤγειρεν, hgeiren) the man to his feet (v. 7) rather than the man rising on his own. In light of the scribal tendency to harmonize, especially in immediate context, the longer reading is slightly preferred.

5 tc ‡ The repetition of ὁ θεός (Jo qeos, “God”) before the names of Isaac and Jacob is found in Ì74 א C (A D without article) 36 104 1175 pc lat. The omission of the second and third ὁ θεός is supported by B E Ψ 33 1739 Ï pc. The other time that Exod 3:6 is quoted in Acts (7:32) the best witnesses also lack the repeated ὁ θεός, but the three other times this OT passage is quoted in the NT the full form, with the thrice-mentioned θεός, is used (Matt 22:32; Mark 12:26; Luke 20:37). Scribes would be prone to conform the wording here to the LXX; the longer reading is thus most likely not authentic. NA27 has the words in brackets, indicating doubts as to their authenticity.

6 tn Or “ancestors”; Grk “fathers.”

sn The reference to the God of the patriarchs is a reminder that God is the God of the nation and of promises. The phrase God of our forefathers is from the Hebrew scriptures (Exod 3:6, 15-16; 4:5; see also the Jewish prayer known as “The Eighteen Benedictions”). Once again, event has led to explanation, or what is called the “sign and speech” pattern.

7 sn Has glorified. Jesus is alive, raised and active, as the healing illustrates so dramatically how God honors him.

8 sn His servant. The term servant has messianic connotations given the context of the promise, the note of suffering, and the titles and functions noted in vv. 14-15.

9 tn Or “denied,” “disowned.”

10 tn This genitive absolute construction could be understood as temporal (“when he had decided”) or concessive (“although he had decided”).

11 tn Or “denied,” “disowned.”

12 tn Or “You put to death.”

13 tn Or “Founder,” “founding Leader.”

14 sn Whom God raised. God is the main actor here, as he testifies to Jesus and vindicates him.

15 tn Grk “whom God raised from the dead, of which we are witnesses.” The two consecutive relative clauses make for awkward English style, so the second was begun as a new sentence with the words “to this fact” supplied in place of the Greek relative pronoun to make a complete sentence in English.

sn We are witnesses. Note the two witnesses here, Peter and John (Acts 5:32; Heb 2:3-4).

16 tn Grk “in his name”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

17 sn Here is another example of appeal to the person by mentioning the name. See the note on the word name in 3:6.

18 tn Grk “see and know, and the faith.” Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation and καί (kai, “and”) has not been translated.

19 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

sn The faith that is through Jesus. Note how this verse explains how the claim to “faith in Jesus’ name” works and what it means. To appeal to the name is to point to the person. It is not clear that the man expressed faith before the miracle. This could well be a “grace-faith miracle” where God grants power through the apostles to picture how much a gift life is (Luke 17:11-19). Christology and grace are emphasized here.

20 tn Or “in full view.”



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