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HEBREW: 5523 twko Cukkowth or tko Cukkoth
NAVE: Succoth
EBD: Succoth
SMITH: SUCCOTH
ISBE: SUCCOTH (1) SUCCOTH (2)
Suffocation | Suicide | Suing | Sukkiims | Sukkites | Sukkoth | Sulphur | Summer | Summer-House | Sun | Sun Gate

Sukkoth

In Bible versions:

Sukkoth: NET
Succoth: NET AVS NIV NRSV NASB TEV
a place where the Israelites camped as they left Egypt
a town of Gad in the Jordan Valley opposite Shechem

tents; tabernacles
NETBible Maps: Map4 F2 ; Map5 C3 ; Map8 G5
Google Maps: Succoth (1) (32° 11´, 35° 37´); Succoth (2) (30° 37´, 32° 15´)

Hebrew

Strongs #05523: twko Cukkowth or tko Cukkoth

Succoth = "booths"

1) the site where Jacob put up booths for his cattle and built a
house for himself; apparently east of the Jordan near the ford of
the torrent Jabbok and later allotted to the tribe of Gad
2) the first stopping place of the Israelites when they left Egypt

5523 Cukkowth sook-kohth'

or Cukkoth {sook-kohth'}; plural of 5521; booths; Succoth,
the name of a place in Egypt and of three in Palestine:-
Succoth.
see HEBREW for 05521

Succoth [EBD]

booths. (1.) The first encampment of the Israelites after leaving Ramesses (Ex. 12:37); the civil name of Pithom (q.v.).

(2.) A city on the east of Jordan, identified with Tell Dar'ala, a high mound, a mass of debris, in the plain north of Jabbok and about one mile from it (Josh. 13:27). Here Jacob (Gen. 32:17, 30; 33:17), on his return from Padan-aram after his interview with Esau, built a house for himself and made booths for his cattle. The princes of this city churlishly refused to afford help to Gideon and his 300 men when "faint yet pursuing" they followed one of the bands of the fugitive Midianites after the great victory at Gilboa. After overtaking and routing this band at Karkor, Gideon on his return visited the rulers of the city with severe punishment. "He took the elders of the city, and thorns of the wilderness and briers, and with them he taught the men of Succoth" (Judg. 8:13-16). At this place were erected the foundries for casting the metal-work for the temple (1 Kings 7:46).

Succoth [NAVE]

SUCCOTH
1. A city probably east of the Jordan. Jacob builds a house in, Gen. 33:17.
Allotted to Gad, Josh. 13:27.
People of, punished by Gideon, Judg. 8:5-8, 14-16.
Located near the Jordan, 1 Kin. 7:46; 2 Chr. 4:17; Psa. 60:6; 108:7.
2. First camping place of the Israelites on leaving Rameses, Ex. 12:37; 13:20; Num. 33:5, 6.

SUCCOTH [SMITH]

(booths).
  1. An ancient town, first heard of in the account of the homeward journey of Jacob from Padan-aram. (Genesis 35:17) The name is derived from the fact of Jacob?s having there put up "booths" (succoth) for his cattle as well as a house for himself. From the itinerary of Jacob?s return it seems that Succoth lay between Peniel, near the ford of the torrent Jabbok and Shechem. Comp. (Genesis 32:30) and Genesis33:18 In accordance with this is the mention of Succoth in the narrative of Gideon?s pursuit of Zebah and Zalluunna. (Judges 5:5-17) It would appear from this passage that it lay east of the Jordan, which is corroborated by the fact that it was allotted to the tribe of Gad. (Joshua 13:27) Succoth is named once again after this --in (1 Kings 7:46; 2 Chronicles 4:17) --as marking the spot at which the brass founderies were placed for casting the metal work of the temple. (Dr. Merrill identifies it with a site called Tell Darala , one mile north of the Jabbok. --ED.)
  2. The first camping-place of the Israelites when they left Egypt. (Exodus 12:37; 13:20; Numbers 33:5,6) This place was apparently reached at the close of the first days march. Rameses, the starting-place, was probably near the western end of the Wadi-t-Tumeylat . The distance traversed in each day?s journey was about fifteen miles.

SUCCOTH (1) [ISBE]

SUCCOTH (1) - suk'-oth, suk'-oth (cukkoth, "booths"; Skenai, Sokchoth, etc.): After parting with Esau, Jacob journeyed to Succoth, a name which he gave to the place from the "booths" which he erected to shelter his cattle (Gen 33:17). It was in the territory of Gad, and is mentioned with Beth-nimrah (Josh 13:27). In his pursuit of Zeba and Zalmunnah, Gideon seems to have retraced the path followed by Jacob, passing Succoth before Penuel (Jdg 8:5 ff). Their churlishness on that occasion brought dire punishment upon the men of Succoth. Gideon on his return "taught them" with thorns and briers (Jdg 8:16). In the soil of the valley between Succoth and Zarethan, which was suitable for the purpose, the brass castings of the furniture for Solomon's Temple were made (1 Ki 7:46; 2 Ch 4:17). Jerome (on Gen 33:17) says that in his day it was a city beyond Jordan in the district of Scythopolis. From the above data it is clear that Succoth lay on the East of the Jordan and North of the Jabbok. From Ps 60:6; 108:7, we may infer that it was close to the Jordan valley, part of which was apparently known by its name. Neubauer (Geog. du Talmud, 248) gives the Talmudic name as Tar`ala. Merrill (East of the Jordan, 386) and others compare this with Tell Deir `Alla, the name of an artificial mound about a mile North of the Jabbok, on the edge of the valley, fully 4 miles East of the Jordan. There is a place called Sakut West of the Jordan, about 10 miles South of Beisan. This has been proposed by some; but it is evident that Succoth lay East of the river. No trace of the name has been found here.

W. Ewing

SUCCOTH (2) [ISBE]

SUCCOTH (2) - (cukkoth; Sokchoth (Ex 12:37; 13:20; Nu 33:5)): The first station of the Hebrews on leaving Rameses (see EXODUS). The word means "booths." The distance from ETHAM (which see) suggests that the site may have lain in the lower part of Wady Tumeilat, but the exact position is unknown. This region seems possibly to have been called T-K-u by the Egyptians (see PITHOM). Brugsch and other scholars suppose this term to have been changed to Succoth by the Old Testament writer, but this is very doubtful, Succoth being a common Hebrew word, while T-K-u is Egyptian The Hebrew "c" does not appear ever to be rendered by "t" in Egyptian. The capital of the Sethroitic nome was called T-K-t (Pierret, Vocab. hieroglyph., 697), and this word means "bread." If the region of T-K-u was near this town, it would seem to have lain on the shore road from Edom to Zoan, in which case it could not be the Succoth of the Exodus.

C. R. Conder


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