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NAVE: Dead
ISBE: DEAD
Days, Last | Daysman | Dayspring | Daystar | Deacon | Dead | Dead Body | Dead Sea, The | Dead, Baptism For The | Dead, Conjuring Of | Dead, State Of The

Dead

Dead [NAVE]

DEAD
Raised to life, instances of: Son of the widow of Zarephath, 1 Kin. 17:17-23; Shunammite's son, 2 Kin. 4:32-37; young man laid in Elisha's sepulchre, 2 Kin. 13:21; widow's son, Luke 7:12-15; Jairus' daughter, Luke 8:49-55; Lazarus, John 11:43, 44; Dorcas, Acts 9:37-40; Eutychus, Acts 20:9-12; see Heb. 11:35.
Prepared for burial by washing, Acts 9:37; anointing, Matt. 26:12; wrapping in linen, Matt. 27:59.
Burned. See: Cremation.
Burnings of incense made for, 2 Chr. 16:14; 21:19; Jer. 34:5.
See: Burial; Cremation; Embalming.
Unclassified Scriptures Relating to
Job 3:13-19; Job 14:11-15, 21; Job 17:13-16; Psa. 6:5; Psa. 30:9; Psa. 49:15; Psa. 88:10-12; Psa. 115:17; Prov. 21:16; Eccl. 9:5, 6; Ezek. 32:31; Dan. 12:2; Luke 9:30, 31; Luke 16:19-31; Luke 20:35, 36; Luke 20:35, 36; Luke 23:43; John 11:25 See: Burial; Death; Mourning; Resurrection; Righteous, Promises to; Wicked, Punishment of.

DEAD [ISBE]

DEAD - ded (muth; nekros): Used in several senses: (1) as a substantive, denoting the body deprived of life, as when Abraham speaks of burying his dead (Gen 23); (2) as a collective noun including all those that have passed away from life (as Rev 20:12). In several passages dead in this sense is used in contrast to the quick or living (as Nu 16:48). This collective mode of expression is used when resurrection is described as "rising from the dead"; (3) as an adjective, coupled with body, carcass or man, as Dt 14:8 the King James Version; (4) most frequently it is used as a complement of the verb "to be," referring to the condition of being deceased or the period of death, e.g. 2 Sam 12:19; Mk 5:35; (5) in the sense of being liable to death it occurs in Gen 20:3; Ex 12:33; 2 Sam 16:9; (6) as an intensive adjective it is used in the phrase "dead sleep," to mean profound sleep simulating death (Ps 76:6); (7) figuratively "dead" is used to express the spiritual condition of those who are unable to attain to the life of faith. They are dead in trespasses, as in Eph 2:1, or conversely, those who by the New Birth are delivered from sin, are said to be dead to the Law (as Col 2:20, etc.). A faith which does not show its life in the practical virtues of Christianity is called dead (Jas 2:17); (8) in Rom 4:19; Heb 11:12, "dead" signifies the senile condition of loss of vigor and virility.

The passage in Job (26:5), wherein in the King James Version "dead things" seem to mean things that never had life, is more accurately translated in the Revised Version (British and American) as "they that are deceased," i.e. the shades of the dead.

There are few references to the physical accompaniments of the act of dying. Deborah has a poetical account of the death of Sisera (Jdg 5:24 ff), and in Eccl 12, where the failure of the bodily faculties in old age culminates in death, it is pictorially compared to the breaking of a lamp extinguishing the flame ("golden" being probably used of "oil," as it is in Zec 4:12), and the loosing of the silver chebhel or chain by which the lamp is suspended in the tent of the Arabic

The dead body defiled those who touched it (Lev 11:31) and therefore sepulture took place speedily, as in the case of Lazarus (Jn 11:17-39) and Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:6-10). This practice is still followed by the fellahin.

The uselessness of the dead is the subject of proverb (Eccl 9:4) and the phrase "dead dog" is used as a contemptuous epithet as of a person utterly worthless (1 Sam 24:14; 2 Sam 9:8; 16:9).

Alex. Macalister


Also see definition of "Dead" in Word Study


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